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I have to use a single read from a file to build a struct which contains chars, ints, and floats. I'm able to read in the chars just fine but I'm having a problem with reading ints

CountryData ReadingFile(Directory* CountryDirectory,int SortedCountryData,char *Code,int NumberofCountries)
{
    int Location,i;  // Will store Location in array and location in bytes
    char Buff[40]; //Buffer the size of the stuct
    char Tok[25];
    CountryData Country;
    off_t offset;  //Offset value
    ssize_t count;

    Location = BinarySearch(CountryDirectory,Code,0,NumberofCountries-1); //Findlocation in array
    Location =CountryDirectory[Location].Offset; //Find location in bytes
    offset = lseek(SortedCountryData, Location, SEEK_SET); //Seek to location in file
    count = read(SortedCountryData,Buff,40); //Read file

     //Data in Buff should be Code[4],Name[25],int,float

    for(i=0;i<4;i++)//Get code
    {
    Tok[i] = Buff[i];
    }
    strncpy(Country.Code,Tok,sizeof(Country.Code));//Copy Code

    for(i=0;i<25;i++)//Get Name
    {
    Tok[i]=Buff[i+4];
    }
    strncpy(Country.Name,Tok,sizeof(Country.Name));//Copy Name

        //This is where I try to read the int
    char INTEGER[4];
    for(i=0;i<4;i++) //Read an int
    {
        INTEGER[i]=Buff[33+i];
    }
    int A =(int)INTEGER;
    printf("Tok: %d",A);

    return(Country);


}
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What is the output you are getting, and what do you expect? –  BobS Jan 30 '13 at 3:22

4 Answers 4

I believe @slugonamission is correct about the pointer issue, but if I understand the problem correctly, the int is stored in the file as an int, and the reason you are dealing with a char array is you are forced to from the way you are doing read.

Try memcpy for this. Also be aware of endian issues.

int A;
memcpy(&A, Buff + 33, 4 * sizeof(char))
share|improve this answer
    
Better still, don't assume that sizeof(int) == 4. –  James McLaughlin Jan 27 '13 at 19:09
    
hmm. but here the 4 is a precondtion from the forma. or not? –  qPCR4vir Jan 30 '13 at 1:48
    
You are correct, James. One has to assume that this file will be written out by a program compiled for the same architecture as the program reading it. If this is not guaranteed, then you really need more information than what is given here. –  BobS Jan 30 '13 at 4:28

The issue is that INTEGER is an array, which is equivalent to a pointer in C. So, when you cast it to an int, you are casting the pointer, not the value, which is giving you crazy results. The solution? Cast to an int pointer, then dereference:

int *A = (int *) INTEGER;
printf("Tok: %d",*A);

As a shortcut, you can avoid the loop with some pointer arithmetic:

int *A = (int *) (Buff + 33);
printf("Tok: %d",*A);

That won't make a copy, if you need one though (like if you plan to change the int and want to keep the buffer intact).

share|improve this answer

Assuming the int and the float were "binary" coded (with write) I will do something like this:

struct Data
{
    union 
    {
        char Buff[40];
        struct 
        {
            char Country_Code[4];
            char Name[25];
            int  A;  /* char A[5]; convert to int using atoi */
            float F; /* char F[6]; convert to float using atof */
        };
    };
};

CountryData ReadingFile(........)
{

    int Location,i;  // Will store Location in array and location in bytes
    CountryData Country;
    off_t offset;  //Offset value
    size_t count;

.....

    Data BUFF;
    count = read(SortedCountryData,BUFF.Buff,40); //Read file

     //Data in Buff should be Code[4],Name[25],int,float

    strncpy(Country.Code,BUFF.Country_Code,sizeof(Country.Code));//Copy Code
    strncpy(Country.Name,BUFF.Name,sizeof(Country.Name));//Copy Name
    int A =BUFF.A;
    printf("Tok: %d",A);
    return(Country);
}

But if the int and float are also as string coded (in text mode, with 5 and 6 char, BUT including the terminator) we can change in the structure the declaration to be char A[5] and char F[6], and convert it to int or float using atoi and atof respectively.

share|improve this answer
char INTEGER[4];
for(i=0;i<4;i++) //Read an int
{
    INTEGER[i]=Buff[33+i];
}
int A =(int)INTEGER;

The problem is related to the array holding your value. Arrays can decay to pointers automatically in C, so what is happening here is that your character array is first being converted to a pointer when used on that last line. After this, it will be cast to an integer (and your compiler should be giving you a warning about it).

To solve, either implement your own string to integer routine or use atoi.

share|improve this answer
    
int A = * ( (int* )INTEGER ); ??? –  qPCR4vir Jan 30 '13 at 1:44
    
I'd like you to edit the answer to make evident the difference between binary and text encoding of numbers in files, and how correctly read it. It seem to be what the OP do not understand. –  qPCR4vir Jan 30 '13 at 11:51

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