Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While trying to speed up a simple algorithm using the GPU with OpenCV, I noticed that on my machine (Ubuntu 12.10, NVidia 9800GT, Cuda 4.2.9, g++ 4.7.2) the GPU Version is actually slower than the CPU version. I tested with the following code.

#include <opencv2/opencv.hpp>
#include <opencv2/gpu/gpu.hpp>

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using namespace cv;
    using namespace std;

    Mat img1(512, 512, CV_32FC3, Scalar(0.1f, 0.2f, 0.3f));
    Mat img2(128, 128, CV_32FC3, Scalar(0.2f, 0.3f, 0.4f));
    Mat img3(128, 128, CV_32FC3, Scalar(0.3f, 0.4f, 0.5f));

    auto startCPU = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    double resultCPU(0.0);
    cout << "CPU ... " << flush;
    for (int y(0); y < img2.rows; ++y)
    {
        for (int x(0); x < img2.cols; ++x)
        {
            Mat roi(img1(Rect(x, y, img2.cols, img2.rows)));
            Mat diff;
            absdiff(roi, img2, diff);
            Mat diffMult(diff.mul(img3));
            Scalar diffSum(sum(diff));
            double diffVal(diffSum[0] + diffSum[1] + diffSum[2]);
            resultCPU += diffVal;
        }
    }
    auto endCPU = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto elapsedCPU = endCPU - startCPU;
    cout << "done. " << resultCPU << " - ticks: " << elapsedCPU.count() << endl;

    gpu::GpuMat img1GPU(img1);
    gpu::GpuMat img2GPU(img2);
    gpu::GpuMat img3GPU(img3);
    gpu::GpuMat diffGPU;
    gpu::GpuMat diffMultGPU;
    gpu::GpuMat sumBuf;

    double resultGPU(0.0);
    auto startGPU = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    cout << "GPU ... " << flush;
    for (int y(0); y < img2GPU.rows; ++y)
    {
        for (int x(0); x < img2GPU.cols; ++x)
        {
            gpu::GpuMat roiGPU(img1GPU, Rect(x, y, img2GPU.cols, img2GPU.rows));
            gpu::absdiff(roiGPU, img2GPU, diffGPU);
            gpu::multiply(diffGPU, img3GPU, diffMultGPU);
            Scalar diffSum(gpu::sum(diffMultGPU, sumBuf));
            double diffVal(diffSum[0] + diffSum[1] + diffSum[2]);
            resultGPU += diffVal;
        }
    }
    auto endGPU = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto elapsedGPU = endGPU - startGPU;
    cout << "done. " << resultGPU << " - ticks: " << elapsedGPU.count() << endl;
}

My result is as follows:

CPU ... done. 8.05306e+07 - ticks: 4028470
GPU ... done. 3.22122e+07 - ticks: 5459935

If this helps: My profiler (System Profiler 1.1.8) tells me that most of the time is spend in cudaDeviceSynchronize.

Am I doing wrong something fundamental with the way I use the OpenCV GPU functions or is my GPU just slow?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm not complete sure how opencv acts if you're calling Scalar diffSum(gpu::sum(diffMultGPU, sumBuf)); I think it makes only a memcpy from the scalar element. So you would have a tiny copy operation from the gpu to the host for every single image element. That would cost a lot of time. –  hubs Jan 27 '13 at 20:21
2  
maybe you can write a mini kernel instead of this line, that keeps the diffval and resultGPU on the gpu while the two for-loops and only at the end you'll add a single memcpy from cuda to the host with the final result. –  hubs Jan 28 '13 at 5:27
1  
Allocating mem space for both Mat and GpuMat objects before the nested for loops may increase the CPU & GPU performance. –  Eric Jan 28 '13 at 6:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks to the comments of hubs and Eric I was able to change my test in a way that the GPU version actually became faster than the CPU version. The mistake leading to the different checksums of both versions is now also eliminated. ;-)

#include <opencv2/opencv.hpp>
#include <opencv2/gpu/gpu.hpp>

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using namespace cv;
    using namespace std;

    Mat img1(512, 512, CV_32FC3, Scalar(1.0f, 2.0f, 3.0f));
    Mat img2(128, 128, CV_32FC3, Scalar(4.0f, 5.0f, 6.0f));
    Mat img3(128, 128, CV_32FC3, Scalar(7.0f, 8.0f, 9.0f));
    Mat resultCPU(img2.rows, img2.cols, CV_32FC3, Scalar(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f));

    auto startCPU = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    cout << "CPU ... " << flush;
    for (int y(0); y < img1.rows - img2.rows; ++y)
    {
        for (int x(0); x < img1.cols - img2.cols; ++x)
        {
            Mat roi(img1(Rect(x, y, img2.cols, img2.rows)));
            Mat diff;
            absdiff(roi, img2, diff);
            Mat diffMult(diff.mul(img3));
            resultCPU += diffMult;
        }
    }
    auto endCPU = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto elapsedCPU = endCPU - startCPU;
    Scalar meanCPU(mean(resultCPU));
    cout << "done. " << meanCPU << " - ticks: " << elapsedCPU.count() << endl;

    gpu::GpuMat img1GPU(img1);
    gpu::GpuMat img2GPU(img2);
    gpu::GpuMat img3GPU(img3);
    gpu::GpuMat diffGPU(img2.rows, img2.cols, CV_32FC3);
    gpu::GpuMat diffMultGPU(img2.rows, img2.cols, CV_32FC3);
    gpu::GpuMat resultGPU(img2.rows, img2.cols, CV_32FC3, Scalar(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f));

    auto startGPU = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    cout << "GPU ... " << flush;
    for (int y(0); y < img1GPU.rows - img2GPU.rows; ++y)
    {
        for (int x(0); x < img1GPU.cols - img2GPU.cols; ++x)
        {
            gpu::GpuMat roiGPU(img1GPU, Rect(x, y, img2GPU.cols, img2GPU.rows));
            gpu::absdiff(roiGPU, img2GPU, diffGPU);
            gpu::multiply(diffGPU, img3GPU, diffMultGPU);
            gpu::add(resultGPU, diffMultGPU, resultGPU);
        }
    }
    auto endGPU = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto elapsedGPU = endGPU - startGPU;
    Mat downloadedResultGPU(resultGPU);
    Scalar meanGPU(mean(downloadedResultGPU));
    cout << "done. " << meanGPU << " - ticks: " << elapsedGPU.count() << endl;
}

Output:

CPU ... done. [3.09658e+06, 3.53894e+06, 3.98131e+06, 0] - ticks: 34021332
GPU ... done. [3.09658e+06, 3.53894e+06, 3.98131e+06, 0] - ticks: 20609880

That is not the speedup I expected, but probably my GPU is just not the best for this stuff. Thanks guys.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.