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I just starting tinkering with Ruby earlier this week and I've run into something that I don't quite know how to code. I'm converting a scanner that was written in Java into Ruby for a class assignment, and I've gotten down to this section:

if (Character.isLetter(lookAhead))
{      
    return id();
}

if (Character.isDigit(lookAhead))
{
    return number();
}

lookAhead is a single character picked out of the string (moving by one space each time it loops through) and these two methods determine if it is a character or a digit, returning the appropriate token type. I haven't been able to figure out a Ruby equivalent to Character.isLetter() and Character.isDigit().

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use a regular expression that matches letters & digits:

def letter?(lookAhead)
  lookAhead =~ /[[:alpha:]]/
end

def numeric?(lookAhead)
  lookAhead =~ /[[:digit:]]/
end

These are called POSIX bracket expressions, and the advantage of them is that unicode characters under the given category will match. For example:

'ñ' =~ /[A-Za-z]/    #=> nil
'ñ' =~ /\w/          #=> nil
'ñ' =~ /[[:alpha:]]/   #=> 0

You can read more in Ruby’s docs for regular expressions.

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The simplest way would be to use a Regular Expression:

def numeric?(lookAhead)
  lookAhead =~ /[0-9]/
end

def letter?(lookAhead)
  lookAhead =~ /[A-Za-z]/
end
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I'll give it a shot. Thanks! –  Cory Regan Jan 27 '13 at 19:38
1  
This is broken: letter?('Ä') # => false. –  Jörg W Mittag Jan 27 '13 at 20:31
1  
/[[:digit:]]/ is better than /[0-9]/ & /[[:alpha:]]/ is better than /[A-Za-z]/. This will match unicode digits/letters. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 27 '13 at 20:31
    
@AndrewMarshall: Correct, I wasn't thinking about Unicode. My primary point was that Regex was the way to go, and your answer is the more accurate one for letters. I'm not sure if there exists a Unicode digit however, in which case the answers are identical for digits. –  PinnyM Jan 27 '13 at 20:43
    
@PinnyM There are plenty of non-ASCII digit characters. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 27 '13 at 20:45
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