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I need to make computations in a python program, and I would prefer to make some of them in R. Is it possible to embed R code in python ?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should take a look at rpy (link to documentation here).

This allows you to do:

from rpy import *

And then you can use the object called r to do computations just like you would do in R.

Here is an example extracted from the doc:

>>> from rpy import *
>>>
>>> degrees = 4
>>> grid = r.seq(0, 10, length=100)
>>> values = [r.dchisq(x, degrees) for x in grid]
>>> r.par(ann=0)
>>> r.plot(grid, values, type=’lines’)
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I don't think that rpy is working with recent R releases or with Python 3. –  lgautier Jan 30 '13 at 0:50
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RPy is your friend for this type of thing.

The scipy, numpy and matplotlib packages all do simular things to R and are very complete, but if you want to mix the languages RPy is the way to go!

from rpy2.robjects import *

def main(): 
    degrees = 4 
    grid = r.seq(0, 10, length=100) 
    values = [r.dchisq(x, degrees) for x in grid] 
    r.par(ann=0) 
    r.plot(grid, values, type='l') 

if __name__ == '__main__': 
     main()
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I don't know rpy at all (and Python barely at all), but: it looks like you're iterating over grid within Python. Wouldn't it be more efficient (if possible) to call r.dchisq(grid,degrees), i.e. make a vectorized call to R? (edit: I see that the other answer has the same example, drawn from the docs ... so maybe there's a good reason?) –  Ben Bolker Jan 27 '13 at 23:46
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When I need to do R calculations, I usually write R scripts, and run them from Python using the subprocess module. The reason I chose to do this was because the version of R I had installed (2.16 I think) wasn't compatible with RPy at the time (which wanted 2.14).

So if you already have your R installation "just the way you want it", this may be a better option.

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