Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given a set of static, nested classes such as this:

public static class LocalSiteMap
{
    public static class Navigation
    {
        public static readonly string Home = "homePage";

        public static class PageIds
        {
            public static class ShowManagement
            {
                public static readonly string Index = "showManagement";
            }

            public static class Shows
            { 
                public static readonly string Create = "addShows";
            }
        }

        public static class Actors
        {
            public static readonly string Details = "actorDetailsForm";
            public static readonly string History= "historyDetailsForm";
        }
    }
}

I would like to build an equivalent JSON string, such as this:

{ 'localSiteMap' : {
    { 'navigation': {
        'home': 'homePage',
        'pageIds': {
            'showManagement': {
                'index': 'showManagement'
            },
            'shows': {
                'create': 'addShows'
            }
        },
        'actors': {
            'details': 'actorDetailsForm',
            'history': 'historyDetailsForm'
        }
    }
}

Each nested class results in a nested object in the JSON. Each string property results in a string Key/Value pair in the JSON.

I know I can reflect over the root Static Class and build a JSON string pretty easily (and that's the approach I'm currently taking), but I wondered if there was a more elegant way to do it. For example, if this were an instance anonymous type then I could serialise it pretty easily.

Some background: this is a set of constants to be passed via a WebAPI Controller to a Single Page Application running in a browser. Having the same set of page identifiers available in both C# (Server) and JS (Client) worlds is very useful for browser automation tests which use the Page Object pattern.

The 'LocalSiteMap' static class is already baked in to a fairly mature project, so changing it to a instance classes or an anonymous type instead isn't really an option for me.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The issue with building a string here is you have to ensure that the syntax is 100% correct, opening and closing braces, adding commas etc. All possible but quite a hassle.

A solution to avoid magic strings altogether is to use LINQ-to-XML as an intermediary translation step. Like this:

public static class NestedStaticClassWithStringPropertiesJsoniser
{
    public static string GetJson(this Type type)
    {
        XElement rootXml = new XElement(type.Name);
        XElement xmlContent = CreateXmlTree(rootXml, type);

        string jsonString = JsonConvert.SerializeXNode(xmlContent);

        return jsonString;
    }

    public static XElement CreateXmlTree(XElement parent, Type type)
    {
        AddStringProperties(parent, type);

        AddNestedClasses(parent, type);

        return parent;
    }

    private static void AddNestedClasses(XElement parent, Type type)
    {
        var subTypes = type.GetNestedTypes();

        foreach (var subType in subTypes)
        {
            var newElement = new XElement(subType.Name);
            var subTree = CreateXmlTree(newElement, subType);
            parent.Add(subTree);
        }
    }

    private static void AddStringProperties(XElement parent, Type type)
    {
        var properties = type.GetFields();
        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            var propertyElement = new XElement(property.Name);
            propertyElement.SetValue(property.GetValue(null));
            parent.Add(propertyElement);
        }
    }
}

It can easily be used like this:

string json = typeof(ATypeWithNestedStaticClasses).GetJson();
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.