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I wanted to know if you can use the import statement in python from a directory that is not your local directory if that directory is not a package? Also, do all the directories on your system path have to be packages? If you add a relative path to your system path, what is it relative to?

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Could you clarify your first statement and maybe give context for the question? –  sigmavirus24 Jan 27 '13 at 21:15
    
I'm doing a sys.path.append() in a python file. I'm wondering if every time the file runs, the same path will be appending to the pythonpath and create redundancy. If so, would the solution be just running it once then removing it? or...perhaps directly appending the PYTHONPATH variable from the shell? –  A B Jan 28 '13 at 0:07

2 Answers 2

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you can alter sys.path in order to achieve all the results you are asking for.

  1. Yes you can. To add a directory that is not your local directory:

    import sys
    sys.path += '/your_path/your_subpath/'  # absolute paths
    import your_package
    

    If you need to load the module from an arbitrary path in the filesystem without adding it to sys.path you can use also imp.load_module

  2. do all the directories on your system path have to be packages? No, they do not

  3. If you add a relative path to your system path, what is it relative to?

    to the directory containing the script that was used to invoke the Python interpreter. I suggest, however, to set it in this way:

    import sys,os
    sys.path.append(os.path.realpath('..'))
    

    or from the path of the script:

    import sys,os
    sys.path.append(os.path.realpath(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(sys.argv[0]), '..')))
    

    both the examples work also from interactive shells. Both examples ensure the relative path is what you meant, regardless of the OS

    see also this post for more details on relative paths in python

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Will this append the path permanently or dynamically. In other words, can I remove the statement after I first run it and it will be permanently in the Pythonpath? –  A B Jan 27 '13 at 23:29
    
It will not replace your PYTHON_PATH environment variable but it will work inside your script. You can later remove it from the sys.path list if you like, it's just a list, an object that lives as long as your script do. –  furins Jan 28 '13 at 0:10
    
so if run once the sys.path list will be permanently altered correct? unless i choose to remove it from the list...? What about if I don't remove the append statement from the file and keep running it, will it keep appending the list with the same path and create redundancy? –  A B Jan 28 '13 at 0:28
    
No. Suppose your sys.path is empty, and your script adds a path dynamically. Next time you'll run the script the Sys.path will be empty again, and your script will add the same path once. No permanent changes outside your script's scope: PYTHON_PATH will remain unaltered –  furins Jan 28 '13 at 0:33

That's really 3 different questions:

I wanted to know if you can use the import statement in python from a directory that is not your local directory if that directory is not a package

Yes, you can.

Also, do all the directories on your system path have to be packages?

No, they don't.

If you add a relative path to your system path, what is it relative to?

Relative to the current working directory.

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