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Im trying to run a code for a mathematical algo (Conjugate Gradient method) - in doing so I input a double precision matrix, defined as such in my preamble. When compiling, I get the follow error:

A=RESHAPE((/ 0,8,0,4,26,8,0,17.5,0,0,0,17.5,0,2.5,-8,4,0,2.5,0,-5,26,0,-8,-5,0 
                        1
Error: Element in INTEGER(4) array constructor at (1) is REAL(4)
make: FTranProjectBuilder: Error: Execution exited with code 2 
*** [cg_main.o] Error 1

My definition in the program with the matrix being defined is given as such (the array definition is the first operation of my program):

PROGRAM cg_main 
IMPLICIT NONE 

INTEGER,PARAMETER                     ::d=5 !use a parameter for the dimensions (simple)
DOUBLE PRECISION,DIMENSION(d,d)       ::A !matrix
INTEGER,DIMENSION(2)                  ::order2 = (/ 2, 1 /) !matrix reshape order

[MORE DECLARATIONS HERE]

A=RESHAPE((/ 0,8,0,4,26,8,0,17.5,0,0,0,17.5,0,2.5,-8,4,0,2.5,0,-5,26,0,-8,-5,0 /),(/d,d/), order2) !specify dxd matrix

[MORE CODE HERE]

END PROGRAM 

The code works without the decimal numbers in my matrix input, but doesn't seem to with my decimals and I have no idea why (I'm quite new to Fortran btw).

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

The wording of the Fortran standard(s) is a little tricky but they mean that the type of an array built from an array-constructor is determined by the type of the first expression in the array-constructor. This is exactly what the error message is telling you.

In your code the expression

 (/ 0,8,0,4,26,8,0,17.5,0,0,0 ...

is an array-constructor and its first expression is an integer constant (of default kind) so the compiler understands this to be a constructor for an integer array and complains when it reads the value 17.5. You can convince the compiler otherwise by writing your constructor like this:

 (/ 0.0d0,8,0,4,26,8,0,17.5,0,0,0 ...

that is with a first element which is explicitly of type double precision.

If you have a Fortran 2003 compliant compiler you can also write:

 (/ double precision :: 0,8,0,4,26,8,0,17.5,0,0,0 ..

that is, precede the list of constants with a type declaration.

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