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I am trying to layout a page in three columns, I want the middle column to resize with the page but the problem is that if the page is made very narrow, the left column either slides below the middle one (if I use float to position the columns) or it overlaps it (if I use absolute positioning). I want the right column to "bump" into the middle one once that one's min width is reached and stop moving, at this point the page should start showing a horizontal scroll bar.

Following is my attempt with absolute positioning:

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en">
<head>
    <title>Test</title>
    <style type="text/css" media="all">
        h2 {margin-top: 0;}
        #leftside {
            position: absolute;
            left: 0;
            width: 200px;
        }
        #rightside{
            position: absolute;
            right: 0;
            width: 150px;
        }
        #content {
            min-width:200px;
            margin: 0 150px 0 200px;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="leftside">
<ul><li><a href="">Left Menu 1</a></li><li><a href="">Left Menu 2</a></li></ul>
</div>
<div id="rightside">
<ul><li><a href="">Right Item 1</a></li><li><a href="">Right Item 2</a></li></ul>
</div>
<div id="content">
<h2>Content Title</h2>
<p>Some paragraph.</p>
<h2>Another title</h2>
<p>Some other paragraph with total nonsense.  Just plain old text stuffer that serves no purpose other than occupying some browser real-estate</p>
</div>
</body>
</html>
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1  
Do you have a link to a live example? Just for future reference, if you provide a live link, someone can go and edit it with FireBug and easily come up with a solution for you rather than having to set up something to test with on their own local environment. My first guess would be to put a container around all of the elements and set a specific height on the container and the elements. –  Austin Jan 27 '13 at 22:59
    
Users typically do not like horizontal scrollbars. –  cimmanon Jan 28 '13 at 0:30
    
Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately I cannot provide a live site. Agree re: users and horizontal bars, I just want them if the page was sized too narrow, IMHO, they are still better than display elements dancing around or overlapping. –  adaj21 Jan 28 '13 at 2:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should be able to do this using a wrapper div along with min-width and eventually overflow, such as: http://jsfiddle.net/5zsyj/

Try re-sizing the window, if the column is < 300px, it will show scroll-bars instead of just resizing the elements themselves, or floating above eachother.

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I added a wrapper div with a min width equal to the sum of min widths of my three column divs. The three columns use divs with classes that float left, right and none, the class used for the left column has a fixed width, the middle class has a min width as well as left margin equal to the left side div, and a right margin equal to the right side div's min width, and the class used for the right column div has a min width and appropriate margins for visual separation. The trick (at least what I found out to work) was to introduce the divs in the html body as right div, left div then center div –  adaj21 Jan 28 '13 at 2:29
    
Thanks to all for your answers. This site has an awesome bunch of people. –  adaj21 Jan 28 '13 at 2:30

A solution would be to add this to the CSS:

html {
min-width: 550px;
position: relative;
}

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/4PH4B/

The basic idea is that when the page reaches the sum of all the column's widths it should no longer shrink, instead just show the scroll bar. Also the position: relative; declaration is there to align the third column to the right side of the html content, not just the window.

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+1. relative is like an "unwild" absoltue because you can apply custom settings, but it's still grounded as a regular element –  user1382306 Jan 27 '13 at 23:38

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