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I am trying to get down to why one of my python scripts is slow by a factor of about 4 compared to gfortran and I have got to this:

import numpy as np

nvar_x=40
nvar_y=10

def fn_tst(x):
    for i in range(int(1e7)):
        y=np.repeat(x,1+nvar_y)
    return y

x = np.arange(40)
y = fn_tst(x)

print y.min(),y.max()

This is about 13 times slower than the following fortran code

module test
integer,parameter::nvar_x=40,nvar_y=10
contains
subroutine fn_tst(x,y)
real,dimension(nvar_x)::x
real,dimension(nvar_x*(1+nvar_y))::y

do i = 1,10000000
   do k = 1,nvar_x
      y(k)=x(k)
      ibeg=nvar_x+(k-1)*nvar_y+1
      iend=ibeg+nvar_y-1
      y(ibeg:iend)=x(k)
   enddo
enddo

end subroutine fn_tst
end module test

program tst_cp
use test
real,dimension(nvar_x)::x
real,dimension(nvar_x*(1+nvar_y))::y
do k = 1,nvar_x
   x(k)=k-1
enddo

call fn_tst(x,y)

print *,minval(y),maxval(y)

stop
end

Can you please suggest ways to speed the python script. Also other pointers to good performance with numpy would be appreciated. I'd rather stick with python than build python wrappers for fortran routines.

Thanks

@isedev, So, is this it. 1.2s gfortran vs. 6.3s for Python? This is the first time I've worried about performance but as I said, I could only get to about a fourth of gfortran speed with Python in the code I was trying to speed up.

And right, sorry the codes were not doing the same thing. Indeed, what you indicate in the loop is more like what I have in the original code.

Unless I'm missing something, I do not agree with the last statement: I have to create y in fn_tst. and np.repeat is just one of the terms on the RHS (place o/p directly in existing array). If I comment out the np.repeat term things are fast...

rhs_slow = rhs[:J]
rhs_fast = rhs[J:]

rhs_fast[:] = c* ( b*in2[3:-1] * ( in2[1:-3] - in2[4:]  ) - fast) + hc_ovr_b * np.repeat(slow,K) #slow
share|improve this question
    
I wouldn't use range here, since it generates a list of 1e7 elements. Could you try to replace it with while loop? –  Elalfer Jan 28 '13 at 5:45
    
While is not necessary. Just change range for xrange`. Anyway I would myself just call the optimized Fortran procedure from Python, if it already exist, why duplicate the code?. –  Vladimir F Jan 28 '13 at 7:59
    
@Balu: my comment regarding copying the output of numpy.repeat into y only applies to the code which produces the same output as your fortran code. Your original Python code doesn't do copying (y is assigned the result of numpy.repeat) but you can't avoid it if you want a copy of x before the repeating sequence (as in the fortran code). –  isedev Jan 28 '13 at 14:33
    
@Balu: you're right about numpy.repeat. It does seem slow compared to fortran, but it is much much faster than trying to implement repeating in a loop, for instance. –  isedev Jan 28 '13 at 14:35
    
Why would you expect an interpreted language to be anywhere near as fast as a compiled language? –  Kyle Kanos Jan 29 '13 at 1:14

1 Answer 1

For a start, the python code doesn't generate the same output as the fortran code. In the fortran program, y is the sequence 0 to 39, followed by ten 0's, ten 1's, ..., all the way to ten 39's. The python code outputs eleven 0's, eleven 1's all the way to eleven 39's.

This code produces the same output and performs a similar number of memory allcations as your original code:

import numpy as np

nvar_x = 40
nvar_y = 10

def fn_tst(x):
    for i in range(10000000):
        y = np.empty(nvar_x*(1+nvar_y))
        y[0:nvar_x] = x[0:nvar_x]
        y[nvar_x:] = np.repeat(x,nvar_y)
    return y

x = np.arange(40)
fn_tst(x)

print y.min(), y.max()

On my system (with 1,000,000 loops only), fortran code runs in 1.2s and the above python in 8.6s.

However, this is not a fair comparison: with the fortran code, y is allocated once (outside the fn_tst routine) and with the python code, y is allocated within the fn_tst function.

So, rewriting the Python code as follows provides a better comparison:

import numpy as np

nvar_x = 40
nvar_y = 10

def fn_tst(x,y):
    for i in range(10000000):
        y[0:nvar_x] = x[0:nvar_x]
        y[nvar_x:] = np.repeat(x,nvar_y)
    return y

x = np.arange(40)
y = np.empty(nvar_x*(1+nvar_y))
fn_tst(x,y)

print y.min(), y.max()

On my system, the above runs in 6.3s (again, 1,000,000 iterations). So already approx. 25% faster.

The main performance hit in this case though is that numpy.repeat() is generating an array which then needs to be copied back into y. Things would be much faster if numpy.repeat() could be instructed to place its output directly in an existing array (i.e. y in this case)... but that doesn't appear to be possible.

share|improve this answer
    
So, is this it. 1.2s gfortran vs. 6.3s for Python? This is the first time I've worried about performance but as I said, I could only get to about a fourth of gfortran speed with Python in the code I was trying to speed up. And right, sorry the codes were not doing the same thing. Indeed, what you indicate in the loop is more like what I have in the original code. –  Balu Jan 28 '13 at 5:18
    
Sorry, I'm new to using forums. So, please also see edit under my original question –  Balu Jan 28 '13 at 5:34

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