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I have a file Makefile.am I am using to generate a Makefile. In the generated Makefile I want to have something like:

ifndef SOURCECODEPATH
   SOURCECODEPATH := /home/root/source_code_path
endif

It seems so simple, does anyone know how I can do it?

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5 Answers 5

Use the AM_CONDITIONAL macro in configure.ac.

The script sets a variable you can test, e.g., a variable that is set to non-empty if the condition is enabled: AM_CONDITIONAL([ENABLE_SOURCECODEPATH], [test "x$ac_srcpath" != "x"])

Then in Makefile.am:

if !ENABLE_SOURCECODEPATH
SOURCECODEPATH = ...
endif

However, since you are explicitly defining the variable if it's not defined, you should probably define it in configure.ac regardless, using AC_SUBST(SRCPATH, $ac_srcpath) :

SOURCECODEPATH = @SRCPATH@ # or $(SRCPATH)
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There's not a way to just tell automake to copy the text from Makefile.am into the Makefile? –  Samuel Jan 28 '13 at 16:54

you could simply use an auxiliary makefile that get's included by Makefile.am (and it's expansion).

Makefile.am:

#...
include Makefile.env
#...

and Makefile.env:

ifndef SOURCECODEPATH
   SOURCECODEPATH := /home/root/source_code_path
endif

automake will not touch (or try to parse) the included Makefile.env

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Didn't test but make sense and seems like the best solution. Hate the idea of using 2 files for something so simple. Hoping to try to break away from autotools for building a 10 file or so GStreamer plugin. This is my first experience with autotools but seems like it's not good for code maintainability and an easy to use build system. –  Samuel Feb 3 '13 at 0:28
    
i think the point of autotools is to provide a cross-platform maintainable and easy to use build system. and it does so quite well. unfortunately it is not an easy to learn build system, and requires that you adapt their way of thinking rather than trying to enforce your own ways; i'm sure autotools has already a nice, easy solution to the problem you initially wanted to solve with your construct (which of course is unclear from the snippet you provided) –  umläute Feb 4 '13 at 16:32

The following solution should work in at least GNU Make and BSD Make. The autotools solution by Brett Hale should work everywhere, but it's considerably more complex.

SOURCECODEPATH?=/home/root/source_code_path
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That almost worked... I had to add a space before the ? and after the = for automake to process it (SOURCECODEPATH ?= /home/root/source_code_path). It copied the SOURCECODEPATH assignment to the bottom of the Makefile verbatim, but it would not compile. I moved the SOURCECODEPATH assignment to the top of the Makefile and it compiled. Any way to automatically move it to the top of the Makefile? I have SOURCECODEPATH ?=... as the first line in Makefile.am. –  Samuel Jan 28 '13 at 17:11
    
Unfortunately, my expertise is with make only, and not with the autotools suite. –  laindir Jan 28 '13 at 17:50
    
Alas i can't insert code block in comment, so i posted answer as a comment, see below. –  darkmist Jan 29 '13 at 18:31

You really should not be using automake to generate non-portable makefiles, but if you really want to do this to generate a Makefile for use with GNU make then you can simply add a space before the endif:

ifndef SOURCECODEPATH
   SOURCECODEPATH := /home/root/source_code_path
 endif

If the e is not in the first column, Automake will not try to parse endif as the end of an automake conditional, but will copy the text verbatim to the Makefile. GNU-make will recognize the conditional with the space (at least, 3.80 recognizes it. I haven't tried any others.)

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It didn't copy the text verbatim for me. It actually just copied the SOURCECODEPATH := ... line verbatim, regardless of if SOURCECODEPATH was defined or not. (Make v3.81, automake v1.11.3) –  Samuel Feb 3 '13 at 0:25

Actually, as http://www.gnu.org/software/make/manual/make.html#Flavors says, ?= is used for variables declared with =. If you need set default values for variables declared with :=, use construction like this:

ifeq ($(origin SOURCECODEPATH), undefined)
  SOURCECODEPATH := /home/root/source_code_path
endif
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