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I'm parsing some structures for a game. I know most things about the structures, but there are various things I don't know, nor do I really care about them. But I need them in my parsing so things line up. For example:

template <unsigned int Size>
class unknown
{
    BYTE data[Size];
};

struct s_object
{
    int stuff;
    unknown<100> unk1;
    int otherstuff;
    unknown<200> unk2;
};

This is a contrived example but it shows what I'm trying to do. I don't like having to name members unk1 and then unk2. Ideally I'd like to do this

 struct s_object
    {
        int stuff;
        unknown<100>;
        int otherstuff;
        unknown<200>;
    };

But of course that doesn't work. Is there a way for the compiler to either generate a random name, use no name, or maybe just treat it as padding?

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the __COUNTER__ macro (but will need some preprocessor trickery). It is implemented by GCC, Visual C++ and probably others.

You can then define a macro named, for example _ that expands to something like _unused_15, _unused_16 and so on upon use. With it your code will become:

struct s_object
{
    int stuff;
    unknown<100> _;
    int otherstuff;
    unknown<200> _;
};

The trickery being, i.e.

#define CAT(a,b)           a##b
#define CAT_DELAYED(a,b)   CAT(a,b)
#define _                  CAT_DELAYED(_unused_,__COUNTER__)
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edit: even GCC doesn't let you do this! Corrected.

In general, no. You could hack together a macro using __FILE__, __LINE__, and/or __COUNTER__ (the latter being another compiler extension, but supported on GCC and MSVC among others) to name the fields for you, if you really wanted to.

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If you really must do this "automatcially", something like this would work:

#define UNKNOWNY(line, size) char unknown_##line[(size)]
#define UNKNOWNX(line, size)  UNKNOWNY(line, size)
#define UNKNOWN(size)   UNKNOWNX(__LINE__, size)

But I don't really see how that is much better than just writing char unknown1[100]. It's not that much longer you know - and you can always copy/paste.

Edit: add extra level of #define.

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It's not for ease of typing, it's so it's more maintainable. Otherwise I need to manage the unknown numbers myself (unk1, unk2 etc). I've tried that example and LINE isn't being expanded into its actual line number, but I'm not sure why. –  user1520427 Jan 28 '13 at 0:04
1  
Updated - I tested it this time. You need two levels of macro expansion for it to work - first level just makes LINE. –  Mats Petersson Jan 28 '13 at 0:08
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sorry but it cannot be done you most define name!

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2  
Why was this "downvoted"? –  Mats Petersson Jan 27 '13 at 23:46
    
Mats Petersson please remove the done vote! –  l1nuxuser Jan 27 '13 at 23:47
2  
I didn't vote it down. I asked why someone voted it down! –  Mats Petersson Jan 27 '13 at 23:49
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