Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was going through some exercises and noticed the following behavior for matching of tuple2. Is there a particular reason for this?

 def test(x: Any): Unit= x match{
  case i: Int => println("int")
  case b: Boolean => println("bool")
  case ti: (_, Int) => println("tuple2 with int")
  case tb: (_, Boolean)=> println("tuple2 with boolean")
  case _ => println("other")
  }                                                

test(false) //prints bool
test(3) ///prints int
test((1,3)) //prints tuple with int
test((1,true)) //prints tuple with int 

If i exchange the ti and tb cases, then the (1,3) prints tuple2 with boolean. I assume there is some type casting going on here, but I'm unclear why.

Can someone give me a quick explanation. Thanks

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

Type erasure. It can't tell what the types are inside the Tuple at runtime. It will compile fine, but it should emit a warning. This is what happens when I do it in :paste mode in the REPL:

scala> :paste
// Entering paste mode (ctrl-D to finish)

def test(x: Any): Unit= x match{
  case i: Int => println("int")
  case b: Boolean => println("bool")
  case ti: (_, Int) => println("tuple2 with int")
  case tb: (_, Boolean)=> println("tuple2 with boolean")
  case _ => println("other")
  }                                                

// Exiting paste mode, now interpreting.

<console>:10: warning: non-variable type argument Int in type pattern (_, Int) is unchecked since it is eliminated by erasure
         case ti: (_, Int) => println("tuple2 with int")
                  ^
<console>:11: warning: non-variable type argument Boolean in type pattern (_, Boolean) is unchecked since it is eliminated by erasure
         case tb: (_, Boolean)=> println("tuple2 with boolean")
                  ^
<console>:11: warning: unreachable code
         case tb: (_, Boolean)=> println("tuple2 with boolean")
                                        ^
test: (x: Any)Unit

Notice the last warning, it says the (_, Boolean) is unreachable because the (_, Int) will match on every Tuple2, courtesy of type erasure.

share|improve this answer
    
ahh, thank you! For some reason, eclipse didn't emit this warning. I should have known better and tried it out in REPL. Thanks! –  JPC Jan 28 '13 at 4:58
add comment
def test(x: Any) {
x match {
  case xi: Int => println("int [" + xi + "]")
  case yb: Boolean => println("boolean [" + yb + "]")
  case (x, y @ (y1: Int)) => println("[" + x + ", int(" + y + ")]")
  case (x, y @ (y1: Boolean)) => println("[" + x + ", boolean(" + y + ")]")
  case _ => println("anything else")
}

}

test(1);
test(true);
test("hello", 1);
test("hello", false);

it seems to work this way. However, just case (x, y @ Int) doesn't work, even thought it complies.

share|improve this answer
    
mmm interesting. I wonder if the @ then avoids the type erasure mentioned by adelbertc by forcing scala to match on y as well. –  JPC Jan 28 '13 at 5:00
1  
y @ (y1: Boolean) can be written as y @ (_: Boolean) can be written as y: Boolean –  sschaef Jan 28 '13 at 8:14
    
I suppose what is closest to the OP's code is case ti @ (_, _: Int) => ... –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Jan 28 '13 at 11:12
add comment

You can try this, it works fine with minimal changes to your code. By unpacking and typing, the function works fine.

def test: Any => Unit = _ match{
  case i: Int => println("int")
  case b: Boolean => println("bool")
  case (x:Any, y: Boolean)=> println("tuple2 with boolean")
  case (x:Any, y: Int) => println("tuple2 with int")
  case _ => println("other")
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.