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I want to write a line of code that recursive indents. I'm just investigating a way to do it using a global tab variable. So I used the following code:

@@tab = '  '
@@tab_add = '  '
@@nl = "\n"

def helper
    left = @@tab 
    right = @@tab
    @@tab = @@tab + @@tab_add
    str = '<hello>' + @@nl + left + helper2 + right + @@nl + '</hello>'
end 

def helper2
    left = @@tab 
    right = @@tab
    @@tab = @@tab + @@tab_add
    str = '<goodbye>' + @@nl + left + helper3 + right + @@nl + '</goodbye>' 
end 

def helper3
    str =  'dawg'
end

I know, it's not the most elegant way to do it but I'm just experimenting. Anyways, when I type

helper

I get

<hello>
   <goodbye>
     dawg
</goodbye>
</hello>

But why isn't the closing goodbye tag also indented? I saved it as the "right" local variable in the "helper" function. Thanks for the help!

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4  
You do know that @@ variables aren't "global", they're "class variables", right? Global are $ variables. –  the Tin Man Jan 28 '13 at 1:11
    
And yes, "class variables" are just about as evil as "global" variables –  Jim Deville Jan 28 '13 at 2:31

2 Answers 2

Your helper2 method outputs a string containing:

@@nl + '</goodbye>'

There's no way that any indentation can fit between the newline token and the closing tag

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You need a recursive method.

@@tab  = '  '
@@nl   = "\n"
indent = 0

def helper3
    str =  'dawg'
end

def indented(p_indent, p_string='')
    @@tab * p_indent + p_string
end

def write_indented(p_indent, p_array)
    return indented(p_indent, helper3) if p_array.empty?
    head, *tail = p_array
    indent = indented(p_indent)
    indent + '<' + head + '>' + @@nl + 
            # recursive call :
        write_indented(p_indent + 1, tail) +
        @@nl + indent + '</' + head + '>'
end

tags = %w[hello goodbye]
puts write_indented(indent, tags)

Execution (ruby 1.8.6) :

$ ruby -w t.rb 
<hello>
  <goodbye>
    dawg
  </goodbye>
</hello>

Unfortunately, recursion is explained most of the time by factorial or fibonacci functions, what makes it more difficult to understand.
It's actually quite simple if you represent the recursion by a cascade of calls :

write_indented(0, ['hello', 'goodbye'])
    ...
    call write_indented(1, ['goodbye'])
       |
       |
       +--> ...
            call write_indented(2, [])
               |
               |
               +--> return if stop condition
                        |
               +<-------+
       +<------+ return   
       |
  <----+ returned value
end
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