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I'm reading this book "The Well-Grounded Rubyist" and this random question came to me. I know in Ruby that it's possible to re-open a class and overwrite the method.

Example:

class A
  def x
    "First definition of x"
  end

  def x
    "Second definition of x"
  end
end

test = A.new
test.x #returns "Second definition of x"

Based on the results above, I was curious if it was possible to overwrite the class method attr_accessor with my own (random) definition. Here's what I'm thinking:

class Dummy
  attr_accessor :test

  def self.attr_accessor(method_name)
    puts "Overwrite the default functionality of attr_accessor by printing this text instead."
  end
end

d = Dummy.new
d.test #not sure why this returns nil instead of putting my message
Dummy.attr_accessor(test) #fails because of ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (0 for 2..3)

For the two examples above, I'm hoping to understand Ruby better by tinkering around and asking questions to get your insight.

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"It's possible to re-open a method and overwrite the method"... uh... It's possible to re-open a class and overwrite a method. –  the Tin Man Jan 28 '13 at 3:43
    
Sorry for the terminology mix up; you're correct - what I meant to say is that it's possible to have multiple method definitions in a class. Thanks! –  Willson Mock Jan 28 '13 at 3:45
1  
That's OK. I was just checking to make sure you understood the difference. The terminology correction is important lest someone who doesn't understand the difference read it and get the wrong idea. Now, what happens if you overwrite the old definition, then code is called that uses the method, perhaps some other gem you need, and it calls attr_accessor, expecting it to create an instance variable's getter/setter routines, and those don't get built because of your overwrite? That's why we are very careful about overwriting core routines. Just something to think about. –  the Tin Man Jan 28 '13 at 3:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, it is possible, and you just did it!

d.test #not sure why this returns nil instead of putting my message

returns nil because you used attr_accessor :test before redefining it below, as such, Ruby performed attr_accessor's default behavior and created a member and accessors in the Dummy class. It returns nil because the member's value is unset...nil.

Dummy.attr_accessor(test) #fails because of ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (0 for 2..3)

fails not for the reason you think. This call works:

Dummy.attr_accessor("method_name") 

The problem is you are calling a method named test and not providing all of it's expected values. See the docs for Kernel.test() http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Kernel.html#method-i-test.

The error message you are seeing is because you are calling the test method incorrectly, NOT because of a mistake in your redefinition of attr_accessor.

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You are on the right path, but class definitions are executed in order at runtime. You need to define your new method before calling it, otherwise the original gets used for that one.

If you do

class Dummy
  def self.attr_accessor(method)
    puts 'your message here'
  end
  attr_accessor :test # message printed
end

d = Dummy.new
d.test # raises an error, since we aren't creating a test method anymore
Dummy.attr_accessor(test) #will still fail, read on

test is a method in Ruby, corresponding to the test builtin in shells. That method is why you are getting an error at the end. What you are actually wanting is

Dummy.attr_accessor(:test1)

Note that you won't be able to call the normal attr_accessor, because it is a private method on the class instance that is self inside of the class definition. (IOW, attr_accessor is a private, instance method on Module, and when executing the class definition, self is an instance of Module)

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Ah ok, so the first thing I learned is that the statement "attr_accessor :test" is actually calling the attr_accessor method I defined. –  Willson Mock Jan 28 '13 at 3:40
    
However, I noticed that running "d.test1" throughs the following error "NoMethodError: undefined method `test1'". On the other hand, Dummy.attr_accessor(:test1) works and returns: This is the method_name: test1 => nil. Not sure if I really get this yet. Any other pointers? Thanks! –  Willson Mock Jan 28 '13 at 3:42
    
If you override attr_accessor without defining your own methods, or calling super (to call the original), then no method is created. –  Jim Deville Jan 28 '13 at 3:51
    
-1: d.test will definitely not print the message. The message will print when attr_accessor is called. d.test. will produce an error. –  Marc-André Lafortune Jan 28 '13 at 4:38
1  
Downvotes are easily reverted, when the answer goes from wrong and misleading to correct :-) –  Marc-André Lafortune Jan 28 '13 at 15:52

In your Dummy class the Class version of attr_accessor is called because the Dummy version has not been defined yet at the point when attr_accessor is called. If you move the definition before the call, the behaviour will be different.

class Dummy    
  def self.attr_accessor(method_name)
    puts "Overwrite the default functionality of attr_accessor by printing this text instead."
  end

  attr_accessor :test
end

This will print your message when the class definition is read. When you try to call the method test on a Dummy object, you'll get an error because no such method was defined.

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What happens if you reverse the order of your attr_accessor call and your def self.attr_accessor? I don't know if that will fix it, but you certainly can't do it in your order. Remember, when you open a class with a line like class Dummy, you are executing real code in real time. So first you are calling attr_accessor and then you are trying to redefine it. Well, I don't know whether you can redefine it like that, but you certainly need to try to redefine it before you call it, or you'll be calling the old version!

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thanks for pointing that out! –  Willson Mock Jan 28 '13 at 3:56
    
I have in fact written a brief intro to Ruby; the fact that you didn't grasp that attr_accessor was a method call or that a def was executable code (and that these things happen in order) suggests that you might get something out of it, since it lays great stress on exactly that sort of thing: apeth.com/rubyIntro/justenoughruby.html –  matt Jan 28 '13 at 4:31
    
thanks @matt, i've started reading this and hoping to learn more from your thorough explanations! –  Willson Mock Jan 28 '13 at 18:23

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