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I have the following in an implementation file...

void ClientList::interestCompare(vector<string> intr)
{
    for(int index = 0; index < intr.size(); index++)
    {
        this->interests[index];  
    }
}

and this in the specification file...

class ClientList
{
private:
// A structure for the list
struct ListNode
    {
        char gender;
        string name;
        string phone;
        int numInterests; // The number of interests for the client
        vector<string> interests; // list of interests
        string match;
        struct ListNode *next;  // To point to the next node
    }; 
//more stuff
...}

is it possible to use the "this" pointer to access the "interests" vector in the struct?

If so how.

As I have it now, I initialize a ListNode pointer to head in order to access the list. I'm just wondering if the "this" pointer can only access members of the class, or if they can access deeper ADT variables embedded in the class.

Does that question even make sense?

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4  
You have to access it through an instance of ListNode. Having an instance of ClientList doesn't necessarily mean you have an instance of ListNode. –  chris Jan 28 '13 at 4:13
    
*this in the context of that function better be referring to a member variable of ClientList and not ClientList::ListNode. Or is that the piece you're missing? –  WhozCraig Jan 28 '13 at 4:17
    
Can you explain what do you want to do with interestCompare? –  billz Jan 28 '13 at 4:17
    
I have two different lists, Male and Female. interestCompare(); receives a vector of interests from a client, lets say a male, and then searches the femail ClientList object to determine if there are any clients with 3 or more matching interests. –  RebelPhoenix Jan 28 '13 at 4:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You only declared a ListNode type inside ClientList class which doesn't mean you have a instance of ClientList. As you hare using std::vector already, you could use std::vector or std::list instead of implementing another list

class ClientList
{
private:
// A structure for the list
  struct Client
  {
    char gender;
    std::string name;
    std::string phone;
    int numInterests; // The number of interests for the client
    std::vector<string> interests; // list of interests
    std::string match;
   }; 
   std::vector<Client> clients;
  //more stuff
};

Edit:

If you want to compare two lists, use std::set_intersection, it requires two containers to be sorted in place.

void ClientList::FindClientHasCommonInterest(const vector<string>& intr)
{
   for(auto client = clients.begin(); client != clients.end(); ++client)
   {
      std::vector<std::string> intereste_in_common;
       std::set_intersection((*client).begin(), (*client).end(), 
                             intr.begin(), intr.end(), 
                             std::back_inserter(intereste_in_common));
       if (intereste_in_common.size() >= 3)
       {
            // find one client
       }
   }  
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks intriguing... although I'm not sure this would work for the situation. I need to search two different Linked lists, and the purpose of the argument was to have a base list to compare the search to. I may be misreading this, but I don't see how that base list of interests is in this function so that it can search an entirely different Linked list. –  RebelPhoenix Jan 28 '13 at 4:39
1  
@MichaelPhoenix see my updated answer –  billz Jan 28 '13 at 5:04
    
I think I follow what's going on in the set_intersection. It looks like it points to the beginning and end of the list of clients, and then gets the beginning and end of the vector of interests to compare with, and then I'm not sure what back_insterter is doing. Also, does the "auto client =" assign vector<Client> clients to it so that the pointers later on can access the data? –  RebelPhoenix Jan 28 '13 at 5:29
    
back_insterter inserts the common interest to a new vector. auto is new c++11 keyword, it deduces the tyep, otherwise you have to write for(std::vector<Client>::iterator client = clients.begin(); client != clients.end(); ++client) –  billz Jan 28 '13 at 5:34
    
I think I'm gonna play with this more... I'm not sure I follow all of it, but I get enough to go toy with it... thanks for the insight! –  RebelPhoenix Jan 28 '13 at 5:41

No, it's different between Java and C++ for nested class. C++ nested class is essentially the same as static nested class in Java. So, you have to use an instance of the nested struct to access its member.

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so if I understand what you're saying, I would have to do something like: ListNode *nodePtr; nodePtr = head; nodePtr->interests[index]; in order to access the vector –  RebelPhoenix Jan 28 '13 at 4:41
1  
Exactly, you need to have an instance of ListNode. –  Dagang Jan 28 '13 at 5:07
    
Actually Java inner class wouldn't work either, since there's a many to one relationship, so the outer class can't find an instance of the inner class. (However the inner class knows about a particular instance of the outer class.) –  Ben Voigt Jan 28 '13 at 5:11

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