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I'm new to HTML/CSS, so bear with me. I have seen similar questions been asked on SO and other places, but can't get them to work in my case. I have a simple two-columns layout. The left column shows a "filter" textbox on the top with fixed height, and a TreeView (ASP.NET) below it. Since TreeView doesn't seemingly have any property to support scrolling, I'm enclosing it in another div. The right column will show results based on the selected tree node.

Here's my HTML:

<body class="page">
    <div class="leftCol">
        <div>
            <input type="text" id="txtFilter" class="SearchTextBox" />
        </div>
        <div id="ForScrollBar" style="height: 100%;">
            A TREEVIEW HERE
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="rightCol">
    </div>
    <div style="clear: both;"/>
</body>

And here is my CSS:

<style>
    .page
    {
        width: 900px;
        margin: 0px auto 0px auto;
        border: 1px solid #496077;
        min-height: 460px;
        height: 100%;
    }

    .leftCol
    {
        position: relative;
        border: 1px solid;
        float: left;
        width: 275px;
        height: 450px;
        min-height: 450px;
    }

    .rightCol
    {
        position: relative;
        border: 1px solid;
        float: right;
        width: 620px;
        height: 450px;
        min-height: 450px;
    }

    .SearchTextBox
    {
        border-style: solid;
        border-width: 1px;
        height: 30px;
        width: 270px;
        margin: 0px;
    }
</style>

Now I'm facing the following issues:

  1. The div "ForScrollBar" spills out of the parent div leftCol, even though I've set it to 100% and expect it to fill the remaining height of leftCol.
  2. I want body to fill the page height, but can't get that to work.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Note: I'd love to avoid JS or jQuery if possible, but would go for it if it is the only way to have browser compatibility.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Try this dotNET. Use % so that it will be easy to place objects in a desired position.

CSS

<style>
.page
{
    width: 99%;
    margin: 0px auto 0px auto;
    border: 1px solid #496077;
    min-height: 460px;
    height: 99%;
}

.leftCol
{
    position: relative;
    border: 1px solid;
    float: left;
    width: 25%;
    height: 100%;
    min-height: 450px;
}

.rightCol
{
    position: relative;
    border: 1px solid;
    //float: right;
margin-left:25%;
    width: 75%;
    height: 100%;
}

.SearchTextBox
{
    border-style: solid;
    border-width: 1px;
    height: 5%;
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0px;
}

</style>

HTML

<body class="page">
<div class="leftCol">
    <div id="inputBox" class="SearchTextBox">
        <input type="text" id="txtFilter" style="position:relative;width:95%"/>
    </div>
    <div id="ForScrollBar" style="height: 94%;">
        A TREEVIEW HERE
    </div>
</div>
<div class="rightCol">
</div>
<div style="clear: both;"/>
</body>
share|improve this answer

Setting height:100% means that the child will inherit the full height of the parent. If you have more than one child, each at 100%, then each of them will take the full height of the parent. The easiest solution is to set a fixed height in px - or you can specify % values for each child which add up to 100.

Alternatively, you can allow the header to have a fixed height and the scrollable area to table up the remaining space using display: table and display: table-row.

http://jsfiddle.net/Cxj4b/1/

Also, you might have more of one element, so try to avoid using IDs unless you want to imply only one should ever exist on the page (e.g. the #page itself).

share|improve this answer
    
you want to say full height of the parent? –  dotNET Jan 28 '13 at 5:26
    
The problem with that approach is that I want the textbox to be of fixed height, as a growing/shrinking textbox won't look good. On the other hand, the treeview should really stretch to full page height. This is how I see it on most of the sites. –  dotNET Jan 28 '13 at 5:28
    
yep that's right –  Aram Kocharyan Jan 28 '13 at 9:22

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