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I have created one C program for client and server for transferring the data from one computer to another. The following code

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream.h>

void main()
{
    int sockfd;
    struct sockaddr_in saddr;
    char *xyz,xyz1;
    sockfd = socket(AF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0);
    saddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    saddr.sin_port=htons(5001);
    saddr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_aton("192.168.0.254");
    connect(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&saddr,sizeof(saddr));
    fgets(xyz);
    write(sockfd,xyz,sizeof(xyz));
    read(sockfd,xyz1,sizeof(xyz1));
    fputs(xyz);
    close(sockfd);
}               

But it shows the following error in trubo c++ 3.0 IDE

  UNABLE TO OPEN INCLUDE FILE 'SYS/SOCKET.H'
  UNABLE TO OPEN INCLUDE FILE 'NETINET/IN.H'
  UNABLE TO OPEN INCLUDE FILE 'ARPA/INET.H'
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1 Answer 1

There is no standard that specifies a sys/socket.h file that Turbo C++ 3.0 supports. For example, SuS v2 and IEEE 1003.1 require such a header, but TC++ 3.0 doesn't support either of them. Either use a compiler that supports the standards you plan to program to or only program to the standards your compiler supports.

Oh, and your code has lots of bugs:

       char *xyz,xyz1;
       sockfd = socket(AF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0);
       saddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
       saddr.sin_port=htons(5001);
       saddr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_aton("192.168.0.254");
       connect(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&saddr,sizeof(saddr));
       fgets(xyz);

You didn't set xyz to any particular value. You can't use its value yet by passing it to fgets. You're passing fgets whatever random garbage happened to be in an uninitialized pointer.

       write(sockfd,xyz,sizeof(xyz));

Since xyz is a pointer, sizeof(xyz) is the same as sizeof(char *). You want to write a number of bytes equal to the size of a pointer on your platform? You need to tell write how many bytes you want it to write, not how big the pointer is. And, again, xyz doesn't point to anything yet, so you can't use its value. You're passing write whatever garbage value an uninitialized variable had.

       read(sockfd,xyz1,sizeof(xyz1));

Again, you use sizeof(xyz1), which is the same as sizeof(char *) and not what you want. You also use xyz1's value, by passing it to read, before setting it to anything. It doesn't point to anything, so you can't use it to tell read where to put its results.

       fputs(xyz);

The fputs function is only for C-style strings. The data you read from a socket is just raw data, it's not a C-style string. So you can't pass it to fputs. You throw away the return value of read, so you have no idea how many bytes you read -- how are you expecting fputs to know how many bytes to write?

Clearly, you're just starting to learn C. You must be a masochist to use a compiler that's 22 years old. For the sake of all that is holy, I hope you're not trying to learn C++ on it, because you will learn everything totally wrong for modern C++ and set yourself back significantly. Those of us who have been programming C++ for that long had to go to a lot of pain to unlearn the old stuff -- don't put yourself through that if you don't have to.

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Your reply gave me a good chuckle! –  the0ther Dec 7 '13 at 8:41

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