Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

protype is an object whose internal prototype property is set to Object.prototype and has constructor property in it.but when we do this:

x=new Object;//

x now dont have its own constructor property why?since prototype are also the instance of function Object but they have constructor property.

My question is since prototypes are also the instance of the Object function and empty object({}) are also the instance of the Object function ,one lacks the property called constructor and one has.Why is so?

share|improve this question
    
@T.J.Crowder no it dont have its own –  Maizere Pathak Jan 28 '13 at 5:29
    
@MaizerePathak: It does for me: i.imgur.com/ENMQfJQ.png –  Blender Jan 28 '13 at 5:29
    
@Blender i said it dont have its own.That construter is inherited from its internal prototype whose value is set to Object.prototype .so from here it is inherited –  Maizere Pathak Jan 28 '13 at 5:31
    
@MaizerePathak: Proper spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and spacing help people understand what you're trying to say. We have those things for a reason. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 28 '13 at 5:50

1 Answer 1

Before your edit

x now dont have constructor property

Yes, it does. It inherits it from Object.prototype.

This code:

var x = new Object();
console.log("typeof x.constructor = " + typeof x.constructor);

...outputs typeof x.constructor = function. Live Example | Source

After your edit

x now dont have its own constructor property

(My emphasis)

It doesn't have its own property called constructor (x.hasOwnProperty("constructor") is false) because it doesn't have any reason to have it, it's on the prototype.

It's important to realize that the link between an object and its prototype is a live link. The object doesn't get a copy of the prototype, it gets a reference to it. When we retrieve a property from an object, if the object doesn't have its own property with that name, the reference to the prototype is followed to see if the prototype has that property (and so on up the prototype chain all the way to Object.prototype). This is the whole point of prototypical inheritance, objects don't have copies of the properties of their prototypes, they inherit from their prototypes.

Here's an example of how it's a live link:

function Foo() {
}
Foo.prototype.answer = 42;

var f = new Foo();
console.log("[before] f.question = " + f.question);
console.log("[before] f.answer = " + f.answer);

// Note that `f.question` is undefined, of course, as we haven't defined it

Foo.prototype.question = "Life, the Universe, and Everything";

console.log("[after] f.question = " + f.question);
console.log("[after] f.answer = " + f.answer);

// Note that `f.question` is defined now, even thoguh `f` was created
// BEFORE we added that to the `Foo.prototype`.

Live Example | Source


Re your comment:

My question is since prototypes are also the instance of the Object function and empty object({}) are also the instance of the Object function ,one lacks the property called constructor and one has.Why is so?

Because only the object assigned to Object.prototype has actually been assigned the constructor property. This is part of creating a function (in this case Object, but it's true of any function). See Step #17 of §13.2 of the specification. All other objects created (literally or otherwise) via new Object receive the property via the prototype chain, but the specific object on Object.prototype has had that property directly assigned to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Crowder u r not focusing on my question.I know those stuff.My question is since prototypes are also the instance of the Object function and empty object({}) are also the instance of the Object function ,one lacks the property called constructor and one has.Why is so? –  Maizere Pathak Jan 28 '13 at 5:39
1  
@MaizerePathak: Due respect, if you want people to help you, don't keep saying "You're not focussing on my question." (Once was bad enough, twice is fairly rude.) I am. You haven't expressed it very clearly, but I think I understand what you're asking now and have updated the answer. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 28 '13 at 5:48
    
Thanks for your post.I will keep in mind what u said. –  Maizere Pathak Jan 28 '13 at 5:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.