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Following code

#include <stdio.h>
int main( int argc, char** argv ) 
{
    const char *s = "";
    if (s == '\0') {
        int x = 0;
    }
    return 0;
}

It does not go in the loop. Why ? ,

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1  
You're comparing the address of a string with a character (promoted to an integer), but yes, "" is just one null character. –  chris Jan 28 '13 at 5:30
6  
I don't see any loop in your code. –  Jonathan Wood Jan 28 '13 at 5:31
3  
It does not go in the loop. Why ? There is no loop. That's like asking a homeless man why he doesn't go home. –  ta.speot.is Jan 28 '13 at 5:33
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try

   if (*s == '\0') {
        int x = 0;
    }

You want to compare the value of s, not it's memory address.

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You've defined s as a pointer to char. As it happens, '\0' is an integer constant expression with the value 0 -- the definition of a null pointer constant.

IOW, you're doing the equivalent of if (s == NULL). Since s actually points at a string literal, it's not a null pointer, so the comparison is false.

I'd guess what you intended is if (*s == '\0') ..., which should compare as true.

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s is a pointer, this version compares pointer

const char *s = null;
if (s == '\0') {
    int x = 0;
}
return 0;

and this version compares first element of string to detect a null string:

if (s[0] == '\0') {
   int x = 0;
 }
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