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I have a specific question about adding supported types to existing legacy std::list manipulation functions. I tried to do this with templates without success, so I'd appreciate any advice on how to use templates better or use different mechanisms entirely. Please take a look at my scenario below and let me know if there's any thoughts on this. Thanks in advance for any help!

I currently have two std::lists of type A, and have insertion/removal/getter/etc functions for them. A simplified code snippet for this is shown below.

typedef std::list<A*> TListA;
TListA ListA1;
TListA ListA2;

void InsertIntoListA(A* pA)
{
    TListA& ListA = IsBoo()? ListA1 : ListA2;
    ListA.push_back(pA);
}

Now, it turns out I need to add type B, and I considered using templates to add this new type (as shown below), but it turns out there are two issues with that.

template <typename T>
void InsertIntoListT(T* pT)
{
    std::list<T*>& List;

    if (IsA())
        List = IsBoo()? ListA1 : ListA2;
    else
        List = IsBoo()? ListB1 : ListB2;      

    List.push_back(pT);   
}

Issue 1: I cannot have "std::list& List" because since it's by reference, it needs to be assigned to an actual list. So I would end up with something like this, which is not ideal.

template <typename T>
void InsertIntoListT(T* pT)
{    
    if (IsA()) {
        TListA& ListA = IsBoo()? ListA1 : ListA2;
        ListA.push_back(pT);   
    } else {
        TListB& ListB = IsBoo()? ListB1 : ListB2;      
        ListB.push_back(pT);   
    }     
}

Issue 2: I am getting type conversion errors with either A to B, or B to A. I think this is because given the template T, the compiler will enumerate all four possibilities for "ListA.push_back" and "ListB.push_back," which leads to inserting A to list A, inserting B to list A, inserting A to list B, and inserting B to list B, and only two of these are valid. So I end up with something like this, which I think defeats the purpose of using templates.

template <typename T>
void InsertIntoListT(T* pT)
{    
    if (IsA()) {
        TListA& ListA = IsBoo()? ListA1 : ListA2;
        ListA.push_back(reinterpret_cast<A*>(pT));
    } else {
        TListB& ListB = IsBoo()? ListB1 : ListB2;      
        ListB.push_back(reinterpret_cast<B*>(pT));
    }     
}
share|improve this question
1  
Create two functions... InsertIntoList<T> and InsertIntoList<A>, InsertIntoList<B>... –  ForEveR Jan 28 '13 at 7:32
1  
You probably have a design problem here. Why is it that you don't know what list you are using before entering InsertIntoListT()? –  Gorpik Jan 28 '13 at 7:44
    
Thanks for the feedback guys. Gorpik, I do know the type before entering InsertIntoListT. I was just looking for a way to reuse code. –  lancery Jan 29 '13 at 9:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't mix all in one function. It's very bad practice. Use something like

void InsertIntoListImpl(A* p)
{
   (IsBoo() ? ListA1 : ListA2).push_back(p);
}

void InsertIntoListImpl(B* p)
{
   (IsBoo() ? ListB1 : ListB2).push_back(p);
}

template<typename T>
void InsertIntoList(T* p)
{
   InsertIntoListImpl(p);
}

or some traits, or something else. But anyway, not many conditions in one function.

Any why not pass actual list to function for insert? It will be better.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ForEveR for your answer. I think this is definitely a more elegant solution of using templates. I think with your structure, the idea is to put the type-specific code into the specific instantiations (i.e. InsertIntoListImpl), and put the type-agnostic code into the template function (i.e. InsertIntoList)? In my simplified sample I didn't really have any type-agnostic code, but I do in my real class. –  lancery Jan 29 '13 at 9:34

Obviously, you can't do the list type switch inside the function template, because each template instantiation is only aware of one of the two types. So you have to do the switch outside the function. Here's a possibility:

TListA& getList(bool isBoo, A* /*dummy*/)
{
  return isBoo ? ListA1 : ListA2;
}

TListB& getList(bool isBoo, B* /*dummy*/)
{
  return isBoo ? ListB1 : ListB2;
}

template <typename T>
void InsertIntoListT(T* pT)
{    
  auto& theList = getList(IsBoo(), (T*)NULL);
  theList.push_back(pT);
}

The dummy is only for type siwtching - could be done via a function template and a specialization but thats ugly. Depending on the real nature of your List variables the getList functionality can be written by other means. Maybe more generic, maybe not.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Arne. This is an interesting way to perceive the type and achieve high degree of code reuse. I will definitely try this out and let you know what I end up with! –  lancery Jan 29 '13 at 9:28

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