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I've looked through the site and can't find anything that is at least comparable to what I'm doing (please do not link any stackoverflow responses or questions I've been looking for an hour), so I've decided to ask this question. I'm trying to create a linked list (not using libraries of any kind) that uses generics, here is all the relevant code.

public class LList<T> 
{
MyNode<T> head = null;
MyNode<T> tail = null;
MyNode<T> temp = null;
int count = 0;;
Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);

//puts a new value at the edn of the list
public void add(T i)
{
    if(head == null)
    {
        head = new MyNode<T>();
        head.data = i;
        head.next = tail;
        tail = head;
    }
    else
    {
        tail.next = new MyNode<T>();
        tail = tail.next;
        tail.data = i;
    }
    count ++;
}

//inserts a new value at a given index
public void insert(int index, T item)
{
    if(index == size())
    {
        add(item);
    }
    else if(index == 0)
    {
        MyNode<T> temp = new MyNode<T>();
        temp.data = item;
        temp.next = head;
        head.previous = temp;
        head = temp;
        count++;
    }
    temp = head;
    for(int i = 0; i < index-1; i++)
    {
        temp = temp.next;
        MyNode<T> myNode = new MyNode<T>();
        myNode.data = item;
        myNode.next = temp.next;
        temp.next = myNode;
        count++;
    }
}

//returns the number of values in the list
public int size()
{
    return count;
}

//returns the value at a given index
public T get(int index)
{
    if(head == null || index > count -1)
    {
        return null;
    }
    if(index < 0 || index >= count)
    {
        System.out.println("This does not exist");
    }
    MyNode<T> p = head;
    int size = 0;
    while(size < index && p.next != null)
    {
        p = p.next;
        size++;
    }
    if(count != index)
    {
        return null;
    }
    else
    {
        return p.data;
    }
}

//removes the returns the first value in the list
public T remove()
{
    head = head.next;
    head.previous = null;
    count--;
    return (T) head;
}

//removes and returns the value at a given index
public T removeAt(T elem)
{
    temp = head;
    MyNode<T> two = null;
    if(head.data.equals(elem))
    {
        head = head.next;
        head.previous = null;
        count--;
        return elem;
    }
    else if(tail.data.equals(elem))
    {
        tail = tail.previous;
        tail.next = null;
        count--;
        return elem;
    }
    while(temp != null && !temp.data.equals(elem))
    {
        two = temp;
        temp = temp.next;
    }
    if(temp == null)
    {
        return null;
    }
    two.next = temp.next;
    T spare = temp.data;
    temp = null;
    count--;
    return spare;
}

//removes and returns the last value in the list
public T removeLast()
{
    temp = tail;
    tail = tail.previous;
    temp = null;
    count--;
    return (T) tail;
}

//creates a string representation of all the values in the list
public String toString()
{
    String result = null;
    for(int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        result =  i + " : " + get(i).toString(); 
    }
    return result;
}

//removes all the values in the list
public void clear()
{
    for(int i = count -1; i >= 0; i++)
    {
        removeAt(i);
    }
}

//searches for a value in the list and returns the first index of that
//value when found
public int search(T find)
{
    if(head == null)
    {
        return -10;
    }
    MyNode<T> p = head;

    do
    {
        if(find.compareTo(p.data) == 0)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        else
        {
            return -1;
        }
        p = p.next;
    }while(p != null);
}

public void itemChosen(int choice, LLMenu[] menu)
{
    LLMenu m = menu[choice-1];
    switch(m)
    {
    case ADD:
        System.out.println("What value would you like to add?");
        T addThis = scan.nextInt();
        add(addThis);
        break;
    case INSERT:
        System.out.println("What index would you like to replace?");
        T replace = scan.nextInt();
        System.out.println("What number would you like to insert?");
        int val = scan.nextInt();
        insert(val, replace);
        break;
    case SIZE:
        size();
        break;
    case GET:
        System.out.println("What index would you like to look at?");
        int thisOne = scan.nextInt();
        get(thisOne);
        break;
    case REMOVE:
        remove();
        break;
    case REMOVEAT:
        System.out.println("What index would you like to remove?");
        T thisHere = scan.nextInt();
        removeAt(thisHere);
        break;
    case REMOVELAST:
        removeLast();
        break;
    case TOSTRING:
        toString();
        break;
    case CLEAR:
        clear();
        break;
    case SEARCH:
        System.out.println("What value would you like to search for?");
        T searchForMe = scan.nextInt();
        search(searchForMe);
        break;
    }
    }
 }

and MyNode:

public class MyNode<T>
{
T data;
MyNode<T> next;
MyNode<T> previous;
}

Where I'm really having problems is at the switch statement in LList where I am scanning in items that are supposed to be set to Generics and obviously there is no method using Scanners to read in Generics. So question1, how do I read in and set these to Generics, and question2, in my clear method in LList how do I send variable i when using removeAt when it is expecting a Generic? Please keep all answers relevant and thanks for your time!

Edit One more question in my search method inside the do-while there is an if statement that says if(find.compareTo(p.data) == 0) how can I change this so that it works? I wasn't really sure of what to put there so I kind of just wrote my thought down.

share|improve this question
    
Post relevant parts of code.. Nobody can read your whole code at a glance! –  TechSpellBound Jan 28 '13 at 7:49
    
You can use remove() instead of removeAt() for your clear() method. –  Wee You Jan 28 '13 at 7:50
    
@WeeYou of just set head to null... –  Veger Jan 28 '13 at 7:57
    
T addThis = scan.nextInt(); is not right. None of the methods in the Scanner return T. You need to right your own generic version of the Scanner class. –  Bhesh Gurung Jan 28 '13 at 7:57
    
@WeeYou thanks that worked perfectly! Don't know why I didn't think of that... –  user1861162 Jan 28 '13 at 8:04

2 Answers 2

#1. You can implement generic console input method on your own - here is an example: Improvement/s to my Java generic console input method?

share|improve this answer

I believe your itemChosen code should be in the main method.

You clearly need to declare the T type.

public void main(String[] args)
{
LList<Integer> myLList = new LList<>(); 

}

Now add your desired case-switch code.

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