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I have a variable start_time and end_time and another value called confirmed_time. I need to do a match that the confirmed_time is in between start_time and end_time. How i will find out. The time is in following format:

starting_time = "Jan 25 10:00:00"
ending_time   = "Jan 26 20:06:59"

confirmed_time is also in the same format.

Any help will be appreciated

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1  
Parse them and compare. Why use a regex? –  flup Jan 28 '13 at 8:07
    
Use your language's Date/Time functionalities. Regexes are irrelevant here. –  Cerbrus Jan 28 '13 at 8:07
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6 Answers

This works:

import datetime as dt

starting_time = "Jan 25 10:00:00"
ending_time   = "Jan 26 20:06:59"
confirmed_time = "Jan 26 08:10:01"
fmt="%b %d %H:%M:%S"

print (dt.datetime.strptime(starting_time,fmt) < 
       dt.datetime.strptime(confirmed_time,fmt) < 
       dt.datetime.strptime(ending_time,fmt))

Note that with no year specified, datetime defaults to 1900. The lack of the year is then somewhat ambiguous however. What if:

starting_time = "Dec 26 10:00:00"
ending_time   = "Jan 26 20:06:59"     # the following year or the same year? 
confirmed_time = "Jan 02 08:10:01"

Edit

You can handle years (as in your comment) by changing the input format used by strptime:

import datetime as dt

starting_time = "Dec 25 10:00:00 UTC 2012"
ending_time   = "Jan 26 20:06:59 UTC 2013"
confirmed_time = "Jan 02 08:10:01 UTC 2013"
fmt="%b %d %H:%M:%S UTC %Y"

print (dt.datetime.strptime(starting_time,fmt) < 
       dt.datetime.strptime(confirmed_time,fmt) < 
       dt.datetime.strptime(ending_time,fmt))
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what about if the date is in the follwing format " Sat Jan 26 00:31:17 UTC 2013" –  just_in Jan 28 '13 at 9:34
    
@just_in: If you use that date format, you will remove the potential ambiguity. See my edit. –  dawg Jan 28 '13 at 16:39
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I suggest you install and use the dateutlil module, as it makes parsing dates much easier.

from dateutil import parser

s_time = "Jan 25 10:00:00"
e_time = "Jan 26 20:06:59"
f_time = "Jan 25 12:10:00"

def example(conf, start, end):
    p = parser.parse
    return p(start) < p(conf) < p(end)

print example(f_time, s_time, e_time)
#output: True

parser.parse can handle most of the even obscure formats:

In[21]: parser.parse("Sat Jan 26 00:31:17 UTC 2013")
Out[21]: datetime.datetime(2013, 1, 26, 0, 31, 17, tzinfo=tzutc())
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def isDateBetween(starting_time, ending_time, confirmed_time):
        pattern = '%b %d %H:%M:%S'

        startDate = datetime.datetime.strptime(starting_time, pattern)
        endDate = datetime.datetime.strptime(ending_time, pattern)
        confirmedDate = datetime.datetime.strptime(confirmed_time, pattern)

        return startDate <= confirmedDate <= endDate

print isDateBetween("Jan 25 10:00:00", "Jan 26 20:06:59", "Jan 27 12:20:00")
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datetime module will be of help

In [41]: starting_time = "Jan 25 10:00:00"

In [42]: datetime.datetime.strptime(starting_time, "%b %d %H:%M:%S")
Out[42]: datetime.datetime(1900, 1, 25, 10, 0)

In [43]: s = datetime.datetime.strptime(starting_time, "%b %d %H:%M:%S")

In [44]: ending_time   = "Jan 26 20:06:59"

In [45]: e = datetime.datetime.strptime(ending_time, "%b %d %H:%M:%S")

In [46]: e
Out[46]: datetime.datetime(1900, 1, 26, 20, 6, 59)

In [47]: confirm_time   = "Jan 26 12:00:00"

In [48]: c = datetime.datetime.strptime(confirm_time, "%b %d %H:%M:%S")

In [49]: if s < c < e:
   ....:     print True
   ....:
True

Check these formats which can be used while converting string to datetime object

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You can use the datetime.strptime to parse the date and time as a datetime object and them compare them. Note, its important that the format's of each of these time remains the same

>>> starting_time = "Jan 25 10:00:00"
>>> ending_time   = "Jan 26 20:06:59"
>>> confirmed_time = "Jan 25 11:11:11"
>>> starting_time_dt = datetime.strptime(starting_time,"%b %d %H:%M:%S")
>>> ending_time_dt   = datetime.strptime(ending_time,"%b %d %H:%M:%S")
>>> confirmed_time_dt   = datetime.strptime(confirmed_time,"%b %d %H:%M:%S")
>>> if starting_time_dt <= confirmed_time_dt <= ending_time_dt:
    print "Within ...."


Within ....
>>> confirmed_time = "Jan 24 11:11:11"
>>> confirmed_time_dt   = datetime.strptime(confirmed_time,"%b %d %H:%M:%S")
>>> if starting_time_dt <= confirmed_time_dt <= ending_time_dt:
    print "Within ...."


>>> 
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@just_in: Look at the linked docs for strptime; they explain how to describe any date format you can think of. –  abarnert Jan 28 '13 at 9:45
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Use dateutil to parse the values and convert them to datetime. Then check that your confirmed_time is in the required interval.

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Why use a third-party module if the builtin datetime can already handle all that? –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 28 '13 at 8:17
    
@TimPietzcker -- because in 90+ % of the cases it lets you avoid the % nonsense :) –  root Jan 28 '13 at 8:26
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