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I have the following output for VPN tunnel status:

[root@localhost:~]# setkey -D
82.113.11.226 10.18.1.201
        esp mode=tunnel spi=143937423(0x08944f8f) reqid=0(0x00000000)
        E: 3des-cbc  c114543c 3049e8b8 c033e4ea 07e0054e 3e8ac254 f0dbb7f5
        A: hmac-md5  8461e21b 2318bb9c 352bee1d e24a0a53
        seq=0x00000000 replay=4 flags=0x00000000 state=mature
        created: Jan 28 09:52:41 2013   current: Jan 28 09:56:58 2013
        diff: 257(s)    hard: 3600(s)   soft: 2880(s)
        last: Jan 28 09:52:49 2013      hard: 0(s)      soft: 0(s)
        current: 852(bytes)     hard: 0(bytes)  soft: 0(bytes)
        allocated: 11   hard: 0 soft: 0
        sadb_seq=1 pid=12264 refcnt=0
10.18.1.201 82.113.11.226
        esp mode=tunnel spi=3053715472(0xb6040010) reqid=0(0x00000000)
        E: 3des-cbc  28c87550 a6c9a17b 37ad0b02 03567617 79647aeb 644563d8
        A: hmac-md5  0ef83de9 1b279a16 658eb176 dad37d50
        seq=0x00000000 replay=4 flags=0x00000000 state=mature
        created: Jan 28 09:52:41 2013   current: Jan 28 09:56:58 2013
        diff: 257(s)    hard: 3600(s)   soft: 2880(s)
        last: Jan 28 09:52:41 2013      hard: 0(s)      soft: 0(s)
        current: 1524(bytes)    hard: 0(bytes)  soft: 0(bytes)
        allocated: 19   hard: 0 soft: 0
        sadb_seq=0 pid=12264 ref 

I want to take lines which only consist ip address and compare if left part of the first line is equal with right part of the second line, which are space's delimited and vise-and-versa. On the first step I made following command:

[root@localhost:~]# setkey -D | sed -n '/\([0-9]\{1,3\}\.\)\{3\}[0-9]\{1,3\}/p'
82.113.11.226 10.18.1.201
10.18.1.201 82.113.11.226

Lines are interested respect to space. Can anybody to advice any awk or sed expression to do it?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's easier to compare strings using awk. Try this:

setkey -D | awk 'NR==1 { a=$1; b=$2; next } !/^ / { print ($1==b && $2==a ? "match" : "none") }'

On your input, my results are:

match
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Great decision, that's all that I needed –  Evgheni Antropov Jan 28 '13 at 8:52
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First bring the ip addresses onto the same line using tr, then use egrep with backreferences to check if they are the same:

$ cat file
10.18.1.201 82.113.11.226
82.113.11.226 10.18.1.201

$ tr '\n' ' ' < file | egrep "^(.*) (.*) \2 \1"
82.113.11.226 10.18.1.201 10.18.1.201 82.113.11.226
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thank you man, I have the same idea, but using while read line. So understood what you mean, but @steve do it more convenient for more –  Evgheni Antropov Jan 28 '13 at 8:51
    
What about the lines in between grep -v '^ ' file | tr '\n' ' ' | egrep "^([0-9.]+) ([0-9.]+) \2 \1" –  sudo_O Jan 28 '13 at 8:56
    
sorry, but I think it's related with grep from busybox and you variant is not worked for me [root@localhost:~]# cat 11122222 82.113.11.226 10.18.1.201 10.18.1.201 82.113.11.226 [root@localhost:~]# grep -v '^ ' 11122222 | tr '\n' ' ' | egrep "^([0-9.]+) ([0-9.]+) \2 \1" [root@localhost:~]# –  Evgheni Antropov Jan 28 '13 at 9:40
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I think that the best way would be to simply use read and read data into separate variables like this:

read -r trash right
read -r left trash
# compare left and right
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Thank you, but this is required more lines of code –  Evgheni Antropov Jan 28 '13 at 8:54
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