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I have a numpy array of dtype = object (which are actually lists of various data types). So it makes a 2D array because I have an array of lists (?). I want to copy every row & only certain columns of this array to another array. I stored data in this array from a csv file. This csv file contains several fields(columns) and large amount of rows. Here's the code chunk I used to store data into the array.

data = np.zeros((401125,), dtype = object)
for i, row in enumerate(csv_file_object):
    data[i] = row

data can be basically depicted as follows

column1  column2  column3  column4  column5 ....
1         none     2       'gona'    5.3
2         34       2       'gina'    5.5
3         none     2       'gana'    5.1
4         43       2       'gena'    5.0
5         none     2       'guna'    5.7
.....     ....   .....      .....    ....
.....     ....   .....      .....    ....
.....     ....   .....      .....    ....

There're unwanted fields in the middle that I want to remove. Suppose I don't want column3. How do I remove only that column from my array? Or copy only relevant columns to another array?

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Are you looking to process the CSV input before it gets into the numpy array, or to remove columns from the array after it's been created? (Or just "whichever is easier" or "whichever is faster"?) –  abarnert Jan 28 '13 at 9:12
    
whichever EASIER –  maheshakya Jan 28 '13 at 10:31
    
@maheshakyha: Then I think root's answer is the easiest. If you can't/don't want to replace your reading with pandas.read_csv, then probably my numpy.delete is easiest, but I think you're better off with his answer. –  abarnert Jan 28 '13 at 10:39
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use pandas. Also it seems to me, that for various type of data as yours, the pandas.DataFrame may be better fit.

from StringIO import StringIO
from pandas import *
import numpy as np

data = """column1  column2  column3  column4  column5
1         none     2       'gona'    5.3
2         34       2       'gina'    5.5
3         none     2       'gana'    5.1
4         43       2       'gena'    5.0
5         none     2       'guna'    5.7"""

data = StringIO(data)
print read_csv(data, delim_whitespace=True).drop('column3',axis =1)

out:

   column1 column2 column4  column5
0        1    none  'gona'      5.3
1        2      34  'gina'      5.5
2        3    none  'gana'      5.1
3        4      43  'gena'      5.0
4        5    none  'guna'      5.7

If you need an array instead of DataFrame, use the to_records() method:

df.to_records(index = False)
#output:
rec.array([(1L, 'none', "'gona'", 5.3),
           (2L, '34', "'gina'", 5.5),
           (3L, 'none', "'gana'", 5.1),
           (4L, '43', "'gena'", 5.0),
           (5L, 'none', "'guna'", 5.7)], 
            dtype=[('column1', '<i8'), ('column2', '|O4'),
                   ('column4', '|O4'), ('column5', '<f8')])
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This doesn't actually answer the OP's question—you've still got column 3 there! –  abarnert Jan 28 '13 at 9:19
    
Yeah, if the OP is willing to change his reading code, and he wants to use pandas, this is probably the best way. (Except you're still not deleting column 3, you're deleting column 2… But I doubt anyone will have any problem figuring that out.) –  abarnert Jan 28 '13 at 9:28
    
@abarnert -- I think finally got the cols right, thanks again :) –  root Jan 28 '13 at 9:32
    
I just noticed that he already had pandas as a tag on his question, so… yeah, this is definitely the way to go. read_csv is much simpler, harder to get wrong, and probably faster than what he has, and there's no good reason not to drop the column in pandas instead of post-deleting after to_records. –  abarnert Jan 28 '13 at 9:57
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Assuming you're reading the CSV rows and sticking them into a numpy array, the easiest and best solution is almost definitely preprocessing the data before it gets to the array, as Maciek D.'s answer shows. (If you want to do something more complicated than "remove column 3" you might want something like [value for i, value in enumerate(row) if i not in (1, 3, 5)], but the idea is still the same.)

However, if you've already imported the array and you want to filter it after the fact, you probably want take or delete:

>>> d=np.array([[1,None,2,'gona',5.3],[2,34,2,'gina',5.5],[3,None,2,'gana',5.1],[4,43,2,'gena',5.0],[5,None,2,'guna',5.7]])
>>> np.delete(d, 2, 1)
array([[1, None, gona, 5.3],
       [2, 34, gina, 5.5],
       [3, None, gana, 5.1],
       [4, 43, gena, 5.0],
       [5, None, guna, 5.7]], dtype=object)
>>> np.take(d, [0, 1, 3, 4], 1)
array([[1, None, gona, 5.3],
       [2, 34, gina, 5.5],
       [3, None, gana, 5.1],
       [4, 43, gena, 5.0],
       [5, None, guna, 5.7]], dtype=object)

For the simple case of "remove column 3", delete makes more sense; for a more complicated case, take probably makes more sense.

If you haven't yet worked out how to import the data in the first place, you could either use the built-in csv module and something like Maciek D.'s code and process as you go, or use something like pandas.read_csv and post-process the result, as root's answer shows.

But it might be better to use a native numpy data format in the first place instead of CSV.

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You can use range selection. Eg. to remove column3, you can use:

data = np.zeros((401125,), dtype = object)
for i, row in enumerate(csv_file_object):
    data[i] = row[:2] + row[3:]

This will work, assuming that csv_file_object yields lists. If it is e.g. a simple file object created with csv_file_object = open("file.cvs"), add split in your loop:

data = np.zeros((401125,), dtype = object)
for i, row in enumerate(csv_file_object):
    row = row.split()
    data[i] = row[:2] + row[3:]
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Except that I wouldn't recommend split for parsing a CSV file—that's what the stdlib csv module is for. –  abarnert Jan 28 '13 at 9:09
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