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Hey all. I have, what appears to be, a trivial problem. I have the following JavaScript:

$(function() {
    var r = GetResults();

    for(var i = 0; i < r.length; i++) {
        // Do stuff with r
    }
});

function GetResults() {
   $.getJSON("/controller/method/", null, function(data) {
       return data;
   });
}

Due to the fact that I'm calling a method asynchronously, the script continues executing and when it encounters the for loop, r obviously isn't going to have a value yet. My question is: when I have a method that is doing an asynchronous operation, and I'm dependent on the data it returns back in the main block, how do I halt execution until the data is returned? Something like:

var r = GetResults(param, function() {

});

where the function is a callback function. I cannot move the for loop processing into the callback function of the JSON request because I am reusing the functionality of GetResults several time throughout the page, unless I want to duplicate the code. Any ideas?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 10 down vote accepted

move your "do stuff with r" block into your $.getJSON callback. you can't do stuff with r until it has been delivered, and the first opportunity you'll have to use r is in the callback... so do it then.

$(function() {
    var r = GetResults();  
});

function GetResults() {
   $.getJSON("/controller/method/", null, function(data) {
       for(var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
           // Do stuff with data
       }
       return data;
   });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the response. The reason I split GetResults out was that I am reusing that functionality several times throughout the page. I should edit my post to state that. –  user135383 Sep 21 '09 at 17:59
    
if you need to do the same processing on data coming from multiple places, just replace your callback function with a named function and do the processing there. $.getJSON("/controller/method/", null, processData(data)); function processData(d) { ... } –  Ty W Sep 21 '09 at 18:03

Ajax already gives you a callback, you are supposed to use it:

function dostuff( data ) {
    for(var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
        // Do stuff with data
    }
};
$(document).ready( function() {
    $.getJSON( "/controller/method/", null, dostuff );
});
share|improve this answer

I've run into something similar before. You'll have to run the ajax call synchronously.

Here is my working example:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/services/GetResources",
    contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
    dataType: "json",
    data: '{resourceFileName:"mapedit",culture:"' + $("#lang-name").val() + '"}',
    cache: true,
    async: false, // to set local variable
    success: function(data) {
        localizations = data.d;
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
This certainly works, but it blocks the UI thread, doesn't it? (Perhaps that's acceptable, though it doesn't seem necessary given the information we have so far.) –  Jeff Sternal Sep 21 '09 at 19:27
    
Yes, it does block, but of course only for the duration of the request. I don't see any other way around it, given what you're looking for. I went down the same road and went the sync route. –  ScottE Sep 21 '09 at 20:45

You could do this:

$(function() {
    PerformCall();        
});

function PerformCall() {
   $.getJSON("/controller/method/", null, function(data) {
       for(var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
        // Do stuff with data
       }
   });
}
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The short answer is that you can't block on an asynchronous operation...which is of course, the meaning of "asynchronous".

Instead, you need to change your code to use a callback to trigger the action based on the data returned from the $.getJSON(...) call. Something like the following should work:

$(function() {
  GetResults();
});

function GetResults() {
  $.getJSON("/controller/method/", null, function(data) {
    for(var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
      // Do stuff with data
    }
  });
}
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Given your updated requirements ...

I cannot move the for loop processing into the callback function of the JSON request because I am reusing the functionality of GetResults several time throughout the page, unless I want to duplicate the code. Any ideas?

... you could modify GetResults() to accept a function as a parameter, which you would then execute as your $.getJSON callback (air code warning):

$(function() {
    GetResults(function(data) {
        for(var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
            // Do stuff with data
        }
    });
});

function GetResults(callback) {
   $.getJSON("/controller/method/", null, callback);
}

As you can see from the general tide of answers, you're best off not trying to fight the asynchronous jQuery programming model. :)

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This is not possible.

Either you make your function synchronous or you change the design of your code to support the asynchronous operation.

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You can have a callback with parameters that should work nicely...

$(function() {
    GetResults(function(data) {
      for(var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
        // Do stuff with data
      }
    });

});

function GetResults(func) {
   $.getJSON("/controller/method/", null, func);
}
share|improve this answer

Move the data processing into the callback:

$(function() {
    GetResults();
});

function GetResults() {
   $.getJSON("/controller/method/", null, function(data) {

       for(var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
           // Do stuff with data
       }
   });
}
share|improve this answer
    
this wont work. your return statement will return from the callback, not from GetResults. This solution will never work as it does not use callbacks properly –  mkoryak Sep 21 '09 at 18:33
    
@mkoryak Thanks. I've removed the return from the callback. –  ctford Sep 21 '09 at 18:50

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