Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Difference between int[] array and int array[]

is there a difference between

int[] array = new int[10];

and

int array[] = new int[10];

both do work and the result is exactly the same. Which one is quicker or better. Is there a style guide which recommends one?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by assylias, home, a_horse_with_no_name, Jan Dvorak, Anders R. Bystrup Jan 28 '13 at 11:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Official recommendation: the second notation is "Yechh": docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/… –  assylias Jan 28 '13 at 10:21

8 Answers 8

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Both are the same declarations. However, look at the following:

int[] array

// is equivelant to

int array[]
int var, array[]

// is equivelant to

int var;
int[] array;
int[] array1, array2[]

// is equivelant to

int[] array1;
int[][] array2;
public static int[] getArray()
{
    // ..
}

// is equivelant to

public static int getArray()[]
{
    // ..
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I personally think the flexibility using [] can be confusing and should be more consistent (and strict). –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Nov 21 '14 at 16:39

From JLS http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se5.0/html/arrays.html#10.2

Here are examples of declarations of array variables that do not create arrays:

int[ ] ai;          // array of int
short[ ][ ] as;         // array of array of short
Object[ ]   ao,     // array of Object
        otherAo;    // array of Object
Collection<?>[ ] ca;        // array of Collection of unknown type
short       s,      // scalar short 
        aas[ ][ ];  // array of array of short

Here are some examples of declarations of array variables that create array objects:

Exception ae[ ] = new Exception[3]; 
Object aao[ ][ ] = new Exception[2][3];
int[ ] factorial = { 1, 1, 2, 6, 24, 120, 720, 5040 };
char ac[ ] = { 'n', 'o', 't', ' ', 'a', ' ',
                 'S', 't', 'r', 'i', 'n', 'g' }; 
String[ ] aas = { "array", "of", "String", };

The [ ] may appear as part of the type at the beginning of the declaration, or as part of the declarator for a particular variable, or both, as in this example:

byte[ ] rowvector, colvector, matrix[ ];

This declaration is equivalent to:

byte rowvector[ ], colvector[ ], matrix[ ][ ];
share|improve this answer
    
The latest version of the JLS is clearer on the subject: docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/… –  assylias Jan 28 '13 at 10:22

Both are the same. I usually use int[] array = new int[10];, because of better (contiguous) readability of the type int[].

share|improve this answer

They are both basically same, there is no difference in performance of any sort, the recommended one however is the first case as it is more readable.

int[] array = new int[10];

FROM JLS:

The [] may appear as part of the type at the beginning of the declaration, or as part of the declarator for a particular variable, or both.

share|improve this answer

there is no difference between these two declaration and both have the same performance.

share|improve this answer

No, there is no difference. But i prefer using int[] array as it is more readable.

share|improve this answer

There is virtually no difference.

share|improve this answer

In both examples, you are assigning a new int[10] to a reference variable.

Assigning to a reference variable either way will be equal in performance.

int[] array = new int[10];

The notation above is considered best practice for readability.

Cheers

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.