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The following code works pretty well printing the paragraph

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion
set "skip="
for /f "delims=:" %%N in (
  'findstr /x /n ":::BeginText" "%~f0"'
) do if not defined skip set skip=%%N
>test.txt (
  for /f "skip=%skip% tokens=*" %%A in (
   'findstr /n "^" "%~f0"'
  ) do (
    set "line=%%A"
    setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
    echo(!line:*:=!
    endlocal
  )
)
type test.txt
exit /b

:::BeginText
This text will be exactly preserved with the following limitations:

  1) Each line will be terminated by CR LF even if original has only LF.

  2) Lines are limited in length to approximately 8191 bytes.

Special characters like ^ & < > | etc. do not cause a problem.
Empty lines are preserved!
;Lines beginning with ; are preserved.
:::Leading : are preserved

Is there a way to add a text marker like :::Endtext so that only the paragraph between :::BeginText and :::Endtext is printed.

share|improve this question
    
What is the purpose of the opening paren in this line: echo(!line:*:=!? – utapyngo Feb 10 '13 at 11:15
    
@utapyngo: !line:*:=! follows this syntax: !varname:substr1=substr2!, whereby every occurrence of substr1 in varname is replaced with substr2. In your particular example, substr1 contains a mask (* stands for any number of any chars) and substr2 is empty, meaning the matched substring will simply be deleted. – Andriy M Feb 10 '13 at 16:46
    
@AndriyM: I know. I was asking about the left bracket just after echo. I tried to remove it but without it it does not work. – utapyngo Feb 10 '13 at 16:56
    
@utapyngo: Ah yes, sorry, you said that explicitly and it was silly of me to overlook it. This is to prevent e.g. an ECHO is OFF message when the expression evaluates to an empty string. As to why ( and not something else, please see this answer. – Andriy M Feb 10 '13 at 19:02
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Sure :-)

And you can embed multiple named paragraphs within your script and selectively write them by using a unique label for each.

The named text can appear anywhere within the script as long as GOTO and/or EXIT /B prevent the text from being executed.

The script below encapsulates the logic in a :printParagraph routine for convenience.

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion
goto :start

:::BeginText1
Paragraph 1
  is preserved

Bye!
:::EndText

:start
echo Print paragraph 1 directly to screen
echo ------------------------------------------
call :printParagraph 1
echo ------------------------------------------
echo(
echo(

call :printParagraph 2 >test.txt
echo Write paragraph 2 to a file and type file
echo ------------------------------------------
type test.txt
echo ------------------------------------------
echo(
echo(

echo Print paragraph 3 directly to screen
echo ------------------------------------------
call :printParagraph 3
echo ------------------------------------------
echo(
echo(

exit /b

:::BeginText2
This is paragraph 2

Pure poetry
:::EndText

:printParagraph
set "skip="
for /f "delims=:" %%N in (
  'findstr /x /n ":::BeginText%~1" "%~f0"'
) do if not defined skip set skip=%%N
set "end="
for /f "delims=:" %%N in (
  'findstr /x /n ":::EndText" "%~f0"'
) do if %%N gtr %skip% if not defined end set end=%%N
for /f "skip=%skip% tokens=*" %%A in (
 'findstr /n "^" "%~f0"'
) do (
  for /f "delims=:" %%N in ("%%A") do if %%N geq %end% exit /b
  set "line=%%A"
  setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
  echo(!line:*:=!
  endlocal
)
exit /b

:::BeginText3
One more...

  ...for good measure
:::EndText
share|improve this answer

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