Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Scapy, I want to save to disk the output of sr for later analysis.

ans, unans = sr(somePackets)

While unans presents no problem with scapy's built-in function wrpcap, I can't seem to be able to save ans to disk.

>>> wrpcap(locationOnDisk, ans)
WARNING: PcapWriter: unknown LL type for tuple. Using type 1 (Ethernet)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/scapy/utils.py", line 470, in wrpcap
    PcapWriter(filename, *args, **kargs).write(pkt)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/scapy/utils.py", line 653, in write
    self._write_packet(p)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/scapy/utils.py", line 692, in _write_packet
    sec = int(packet.time)
AttributeError: 'tuple' object has no attribute 'time'

Indeed, it's the attribute time added by sr to each packet that I'm mostly interested in.

So I tried with pickle, but it went even worse:

>>> pickle.dump(ans, open(locationOnDisk, "w+"))
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1370, in dump
    Pickler(file, protocol).dump(obj)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 224, in dump
    self.save(obj)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 725, in save_inst
    save(stuff)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 649, in save_dict
    self._batch_setitems(obj.iteritems())
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 663, in _batch_setitems
    save(v)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 600, in save_list
    self._batch_appends(iter(obj))
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 615, in _batch_appends
    save(x)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 562, in save_tuple
    save(element)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 331, in save
    self.save_reduce(obj=obj, *rv)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 419, in save_reduce
    save(state)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 649, in save_dict
    self._batch_setitems(obj.iteritems())
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 663, in _batch_setitems
    save(v)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 649, in save_dict
    self._batch_setitems(obj.iteritems())
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 663, in _batch_setitems
    save(v)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 725, in save_inst
    save(stuff)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 649, in save_dict
    self._batch_setitems(obj.iteritems())
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 663, in _batch_setitems
    save(v)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 286, in save
    f(self, obj) # Call unbound method with explicit self
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 748, in save_global
    (obj, module, name))
pickle.PicklingError: Can't pickle <function <lambda> at 0x976c224>: it's not found as scapy.layers.inet.<lambda>

Any way to go around this?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure ans is an iterable of packets? scapy's first response tells you that it was expecting to see some sort of packets, but instead got an unexpected tuple. Reading the manual (goo.gl/XPB0V) has this quote: The “send’n’receive” functions family is the heart of scapy. They return a couple of two lists. The first element is a list of couples (packet sent, answer), and the second element is the list of unanswered packets.. So ans isn't what you think it is. –  Asim Ihsan Jan 28 '13 at 12:16
    
Sorry, I didn't see your comment before. I am quite familiar with ans, but I didn't get what you said about it being or not an iterable of packets. I just wanted to save the content of ans to disk, not much else. :) –  Ricky Robinson Feb 12 '13 at 18:30
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
[13:44:49][root@box:~]$ scapy    
Welcome to Scapy (2.1.0)
>>> sr
<function sr at 0x8cc3614>
>>> ans, unans = sr(IP(dst="www.slashdot.org")/ICMP()/"XXXXXXXXXXX")
Begin emission:
.Finished to send 1 packets.
.*
Received 3 packets, got 1 answers, remaining 0 packets

>>> ans
<Results: TCP:0 UDP:0 ICMP:1 Other:0>
>>> type(ans)
<type 'instance'>
>>> dir(ans)
['__add__', '__doc__', '__getattr__', '__getitem__', '__getslice__', '__init__', '__module__', '__repr__', '_dump_document', '_elt2pkt', '_elt2show', '_elt2sum', 'afterglow', 'conversations', 'diffplot', 'display', 'filter', 'hexdump', 'hexraw', 'listname', 'make_lined_table', 'make_table', 'make_tex_table', 'multiplot', 'nsummary', 'nzpadding', 'padding', 'pdfdump', 'plot', 'psdump', 'rawhexdump', 'replace', 'res', 'sessions', 'show', 'sr', 'stats', 'summary', 'timeskew_graph']

So what do we know? We now know that ans is definitely not a list of packets, but is instead some other instance object that offers tuple semantics (__getitem__, etc.), and hence scapy will refuse to dump this to a capture file:

>>> wrpcap("test.cap", ans)
WARNING: PcapWriter: unknown LL type for tuple. Using type 1 (Ethernet)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<console>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/scapy/utils.py", line 466, in wrpcap
    PcapWriter(filename, *args, **kargs).write(pkt)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/scapy/utils.py", line 649, in write
    self._write_packet(p)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/scapy/utils.py", line 688, in _write_packet
    sec = int(packet.time)
AttributeError: 'tuple' object has no attribute 'time'

As I said in the comment above, the hint is in the error message. ans is not what you think it is:

>>> type(ans[0])
<type 'tuple'>
>>> len(ans[0])
2
>>> ans[0]
(<IP  frag=0 proto=icmp dst=216.34.181.48 |<ICMP  |<Raw  load='XXXXXXXXXXX' |>>>, <IP  version=4L ihl=5L tos=0x0 len=39 id=51902 flags=DF frag=0L ttl=235 proto=icmp chksum=0xbe0 src=216.34.181.48 dst=10.227.33.1 options=[] |<ICMP  type=echo-reply code=0 chksum=0xee45 id=0x0 seq=0x0 |<Raw  load='XXXXXXXXXXX' |<Padding  load='\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00' |>>>>)
>>> ans[0][0]
<IP  frag=0 proto=icmp dst=216.34.181.48 |<ICMP  |<Raw  load='XXXXXXXXXXX' |>>>
>>> ans[0][1]
<IP  version=4L ihl=5L tos=0x0 len=39 id=51902 flags=DF frag=0L ttl=235 proto=icmp chksum=0xbe0 src=216.34.181.48 dst=10.227.33.1 options=[] |<ICMP  type=echo-reply code=0 chksum=0xee45 id=0x0 seq=0x0 |<Raw  load='XXXXXXXXXXX' |<Padding  load='\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00' |>>>>

So what do we know now? Each element of ans is a two-tuple:

  • The first element of the tuple is the sent packet.
  • The second element of the tuple is the respective packet received

Hence, let's say you want both kinds of packets in your output:

>>> all_packets = [elem[0] for elem in ans] + [elem[1] for elem in ans]
>>> import operator
>>> all_packets.sort(key=operator.attrgetter("time"))
>>> wrpcap("test.cap", all_packets)
/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/scapy/utils.py:665: DeprecationWarning: 'I' format requires 0 <= number <= 4294967295
  self.f.write(struct.pack(self.endian+"IIII", sec, usec, caplen, wirelen))
>>> exit()

[14:03:09][root@box:~]$ ls -ltra | tail -1
-rw-r--r--  1 root root       141 2013-02-13 14:02 test.cap

I've confirmed that this file opens correctly in Wireshark, so you should be good to go; I'd suggest further testing to be sure. However, the conclusion stands: ans is not what you think it is.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.