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I am new to JavaScript environment.I have read that <script> </script> tag can be placed either in the <head> </head> or <body></body> tag of the document. But when I place <script> tag under the <head></head> the output is different. Please review the code:-

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script>
function myFunction(a,b)
{
return a*b;
}

document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML=myFunction(4,3);
</script>
</head>
<body>

<p>This example calls a function which perfoms a calculation, and returns the result:</p>

<p id="demo"></p>

</body>
</html>

Output:- This example calls a function which performs a calculation, and returns the result:

Whereas if <script></script> is placed under <body></body> then I get a different Output. Please find the code and the following output:-

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<p>This example calls a function which perfoms a calculation, and returns the result:</p>

<p id="demo"></p>

<script>
function myFunction(a,b)
{
return a*b;
}

document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML=myFunction(4,3);
</script>

</body>
</html>

Output:-

This example calls a function which perfoms a calculation, and returns the result:

12

Any help is highly appreciated.

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3  
What is the difference in output that you see? –  alepuzio Jan 28 '13 at 10:35
    
"output is different" - different from what? And what's the difference? –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 28 '13 at 10:36
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When the following line of code runs, it searches the DOM for an element with the given ID:

document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML=myFunction(4,3);

When that code is in the head, that element will not yet exist, and therefore the code will fail. When the code is in the body (after the element in question), it obviously does exist and can be found.

You could use a DOM ready event handler of some description in your script if you want to keep it in the head. But "best practice" says to place scripts at the bottom of the body.

In your case, this is the effect you would see depending on the location of your script:

<html>
    <head>
        <!-- Script here fails -->
    </head>
    <body>
        <!--- Script here fails --->
        <p>This example calls a function...</p>
        <!-- Script here fails -->
        <p id="demo"></p>
        <!-- Script here works! --->
    </body>
</html>

Note, however, that your function declaration could go anywhere, since it doesn't do anything before it's invoked. The invocation is the only part that will have to run after the element exists in the DOM.

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+1, thanks for the explanation:) –  Ankit Jan 28 '13 at 10:49
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The Element demo hasn't been loaded when document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML=myFunction(4,3); is beeing called because its on top of its declaration.

You can make it run properly, wrapping tha call in an onload-event in the body like that:

<body onload="document.getElementById('demo').innerHTML=myFunction(4,3);">

while the function declatration remains in the head. This way, the function is beeing called, once the page is fully loaded. Not the nicest style here (because of the long call, which could be wrapped in a separate function making the code more readable), but i guess you get the idea.

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Just remember 3 Simple Logic For calling Javascript,

1) Call to javascript in <head> ... </head> tag are for initializing / importing another library to current page.

2) Call to javascript between <body> ... </body> tag is to manipulate the DOM elements. Because code executes when the page content is being loaded.

For best practice DOM events are coded at the bottom of the page.

3) The best solution is that "DECLARE JAVASCRIPT CODE IN THE OTHER .JS FILE AND CALL THEM INTO YOUR HTML FILE ANYWHERE. USING <SCRIPT SRC="path" ></SCRIPT> CODE. IT WOULD WORKS FINE.

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+!1 for the logic. thanks :) –  Ankit Jan 28 '13 at 10:52
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