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I'm trying out git at the moment, and am trying to create a workflow so that a push to a bare remote repo on the server will update 2 different sites based on different branches.

The post-receive hook is:

#!/bin/sh
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/development/ git checkout -f master
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/production/ git checkout -f production

based on http://stackoverflow.com/a/3838804/1097483 but with a few modifications.

Unfortunately while testing it, commiting a new test file to any of the branches will be pushed and successfully update the web root, but for deleting the same test file, the web root still retains a copy of the deleted file.

Does anyone know how I can get the post-receive hook to force a delete?

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3 Answers 3

You should probably use git-reset and git-clean:

#!/bin/sh
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/development/ git reset --hard master
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/development/ git clean -fdx
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/production/ git reset --hard production
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/production/ git clean -fdx
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It didn't exactly work, not exactly sure if its due to permissions or something: (using TortoiseGit) remote: error: packfile ./objects/pack/pack-<random string here>.pack cannot be accessed remote: HEAD is now at <another random string> test but I managed to get it working with a bit of modification. –  xiankai Jan 29 '13 at 3:10

I think that the work-tree checkout does not record any information about the repository in the working directory. So when updating an already checked-out version, Git will not be able to tell which diff it would have to apply and as such which files it needs to remove.

Easiest solution would be to remove all files in the folders before checking them out..

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Thanks for explaining what happens behind the scenes, that makes sense. –  xiankai Jan 29 '13 at 1:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up doing

#!/bin/sh
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/development/ git checkout -f master
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/development/ git clean -fdx
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/production/ git checkout -f production
GIT_WORK_TREE=/www/production/ git clean -fdx

based off @Koraktor 's answer.

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