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I used to use

MyClass.prototype.myMethod1 = function(value) {
    this._current = this.getValue("key", function(value2){
        return value2;
    });
};

How do I access the value of this within the callback function like below?

MyClass.prototype.myMethod1 = function(value) {
   this.getValue("key", function(value2){
       //ooopss! this is not the same here!    
       this._current = value2;
   });
};
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marked as duplicate by Mike Samuel, Felix Kling, jAndy, Louis, Dimitri M Mar 8 at 13:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
you could always pass this over as a second argument. Not sure if it would work though. –  starbeamrainbowlabs Jan 28 '13 at 12:12
    
It really does not have anything to do with whether a function is anonymous or not. –  Felix Kling Jan 28 '13 at 12:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
MyClass.prototype.myMethod1 = function(value) {
    var that = this;
    this.getValue("key", function(value2){
         //ooopss! this is not the same here!
         // but that is what you want
         that._current = value2;
    });

};

Or you could make your getValue method execute the callback with this set to the instance (using call/apply).

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Declare a variable in the external scope to hold your this :

MyClass.prototype.myMethod1 = function(value) {
    var that = this;
    this.getValue("key", function(value2){
         that._current = value2;
    });

};
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Declare it as a variable before

MyClass.prototype.myMethod1 = function(value) {
var oldThis = this;
 this.getValue("key", function(value2){
    /// oldThis is accessible here.
    });

};
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