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I am learning socket program in ubuntu for which I wrote the following program for server client communication. The program is not opening the ports. I also have some other questions regarding server client communications:

  • When the server accepts the client request, does server starts reading from client the moment it accepts the request?
  • Is the file descriptor returned by u_connect and u_accept() same? (I couldn't find it out because my ports are not opening)
  • Can I use a random number as port since I am testing server client talk on the same computer?

I am using a wrapper library which contains the OS functions for socket programming.

Here is the code:

Server.c

int main()
{
  char client[50];
  char buf[1024];
  u_port_t portnumber;
  portnumber = 4862;
  int fd = u_open(portnumber);
  int communFd = u_accept(fd, client, 50);
  printf("Opened com %d\n\n", communFd);
  fprintf(stderr, "\nComun fd is %d\n\n\n", communFd);
  read(communFd, buf, 1024);
  write(STDOUT_FILENO, buf, 1024);
  fprintf(stderr, "\n\nReading complete\n");
  return 0;
}

Client.c

int main()
{
  u_port_t portnumber;
  portnumber = 4862;
  char client[] = "Alfred";
  char buf[1024];
  int communFd = u_connect(portnumber, client);
  printf("comun is %d\n", communFd);
  read(STDIN_FILENO, buf, 1024);
  write(communFd, buf, 1024);
  return 0;
}
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4  
I think using a third-party socket library which is not well-known makes this question rather localized. –  unwind Jan 28 '13 at 13:20
2  
You have to check for errors. System calls on POSIX systems (like Linux) generally returns -1 on error. You can check the value of the global variable errno to see what's wrong. You can use perror to print out a message with the error. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 28 '13 at 13:20
    
@unwind I said wrapper wraps the C socket functions. like u_connect contains *nix connect() function in it. –  James Aflred Jan 28 '13 at 13:27
    
@JamesAflred: u_connect also does other things. Its docs says that on failure it returns -1 and sets errno variable. You might want to check what's in there, as "The program is not opening the ports." is quite wide problem description. –  che Jan 28 '13 at 13:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When the server accepts the client request, does server starts reading from client the moment it accepts the request?

Server can read when the data sent by the client (via write()) is received and available into the socket read buffer.

Is the file descriptor returned by u_connect and u_accept() same? (I couldn't find it out because my ports are not opening)

No. Not even if server and client sides are running in the same process.

Can I use a random number as port since I am testing server client talk on the same computer?

You can bind on a port from 0 to 65535. The ones from 0 to 1024 are called known ports and are already assigned to specific services by IANA. My suggestion is to use a port number in the range 49152-65535 but noone forbid you to use it a low value.

If the port is bind by another process it will return an error code. Try with another one

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ok so in the program provided above, client writes data in a file descriptor returned by connect() function, the server reads data from the file descriptor returned by u_accept(). If the files descriptors are not same, from where does the server reads the data written by the client? –  James Aflred Jan 28 '13 at 13:45
    
those aren't the same file descriptors (how can they be the same if we're talking about 2 different processes?) but they're logically connected via TCP. Anyway, I lurked into the library... I think you should use localhost as static string instead of Alfred in the client[] array –  Davide Berra Jan 28 '13 at 13:54
    
can you tell me What is hostname and what is its role in socket programming? –  James Aflred Jan 28 '13 at 14:21
    
If you look into the library, (u_connect function for example) you'll see the hostname will be converted into an ip address by function name2addr. Sockets works only with plain ip address, not names, so an hostname must be converted. localhost is the standard hostname to indicate "the current host" –  Davide Berra Jan 28 '13 at 14:26
    
I got it that localhost is a standard hostname of the given library. I am still confuse about the purpose of hostname in socket programming. I mean sockets work with IPs and stuff then what does a hostname do? –  James Aflred Jan 28 '13 at 14:30

This is wrong.

read(communFd, buf, 1024);
write(STDOUT_FILENO, buf, 1024);

You should do this instead:

ssize_t r;
size_t space_left = 1024
while ((r=read(communFd, buf, space_left))>0) {
    space_left-=r;
    write(STDOUT_FILENO,buf,r);
}

Because what is sent in a single write could be fragmented over the network and be retrieved with many reads.

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the problem is not read or writing the data. This is a test program in which I am testing how server and client connect. but the client is not connecting with server –  James Aflred Jan 28 '13 at 13:52
    
I don't want to check your special library. If you don't use a normal one, do it yourself. Anyway the thing I've pointed out IS a problem, you just didn't hit it yet because your connection is not working either. –  LtWorf Jan 29 '13 at 15:28

Firstly, I would recommend against using that wrapper because it uses some pretty archaic techniques. I suggest reading up on getaddrinfo, bind, listen, recv, send and close and rolling your own POSIX socket code. You'll get a much better understanding. I also suggest reading Beej's Guide to Network Programming. Perhaps a book might even come in handy...

  1. No. The read() function does the reading, not the server. On that note, it would be a good idea to store the return value of read() somewhere and work out what is significant about it. Here is the manual, if you believe, like many of us, that reading is a more efficient mechanism than trial and error.
  2. No. u_open appears to return a server socket, of which read() is not a valid action, though accept() is. u_accept appears to return a peer socket, of which accept() is not a valid action, though read() is.
  3. Sure, providing that the port is greater than 1024 (less than 1024 typically requires superuser privileges), less than 65535, and that the port isn't already bound to.
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