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I want the critical section for safety of queue, so that the threads don't access queue at the same time. This code works even if I comment lines related to the Critical section. Can anyone explain why?

queue<int> que;
CRITICAL_SECTION csection;
int i=0;

DWORD WINAPI ProducerThread(void*)
{

    while(1)
    {
        //if(TryEnterCriticalSection(&csection))
        {
            cout<<"Pushing value "<<i<<endl;
            que.push(i++);
            //LeaveCriticalSection(&csection);
        }
    }
}

//Consumer tHread that pops out the elements from front of queue
DWORD WINAPI ConsumerThread(void*)
{
    while(1)
    {
        //if(TryEnterCriticalSection(&csection))
        {
            if(!que.empty())
            {
                cout<<"Value in queue is "<<que.front()<<endl;
                que.pop();
            }
            else
                Sleep(2000);
            //LeaveCriticalSection(&csection);
        }
    }
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    HANDLE handle[2];
    //InitializeCriticalSection(&csection);
    handle[0]=NULL;
    handle[1]=NULL;
    handle[0]=CreateThread(0,0,(LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)ProducerThread,0,0,0);
    if(handle[0]==NULL)
        ExitProcess(1);

    handle[1]=CreateThread(0,0,(LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)ConsumerThread,0,0,0);
    if(handle[1]==NULL)
        ExitProcess(1);

    WaitForMultipleObjects(2,handle,true,INFINITE);

    return 0;
}
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Define "works". AFAICS the process exits as soon as it launches the first thread. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 28 '13 at 13:21
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes Despite the lack of indentation, the ExitProcess calls are conditional and only run on error cases –  simonc Jan 28 '13 at 13:23
1  
@simonc oh, you're right. And kids, this is why you should indent your code properly. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 28 '13 at 13:23
    
Do you have a multi-core processor (or multiple processors)? How long have you run it for, and have you tried without "cout" [just check that the value you got now+1 is equal to the value you get next]. –  Mats Petersson Jan 28 '13 at 13:24

4 Answers 4

This works accidentially, presumably for two reasons:

  1. It does not work, but you never notice. The consumer pulls whatever is on the queue, or whatever it thinks is on the queue. If there is nothing, it sleeps until the producer has pushed something. This "works" because the producer only appends to the end whereas the consumer only reads from the beginning. Except for updating size. You will in all likelihood, eventually have a queue that is in a state where there are elements but size does not reflect it. This is nasty, but the opposite, which will likely occur sooner or later too, is even more nasty.
    You have no way of knowing. Well, you might know eventually, if work items that are queued "disappear" for some reason or if you run out of memory, but try and figure out the reason then.
  2. You use printf(or std::cout, which is the same), which is internally locked by a critical section. This "kind of" locks access to the queue in the way you need, except when it doesn't. It will work 99.9% of the time (by accident, as the consumer will be blocked trying to print, which takes longer to wake than the producer appending to the queue). However, when a context switch happens just after printing, it suddenly fails. Bang, you're dead.

You really absolutely need to protect critical code sections with a critical section object or a mutex. Otherwise, results are unpredictable. And contrary to what one may believe, "but it works" is not a good thing, it is the worst thing that can happen. Because it only works until it doesn't, and then you don't know why.

That said, you can use an IO completion port, which does all that work for you, very efficiently. You can use GetQueuedCompletionStatus to pull an "event" from the port and use PostQueuedCompletionStatus to post one. The completion port does the whole handling of the queue including proper synchronization to several consumers for you (and it does that in a LIFO order, which is advantageous to avoid context switches and cache invalidation).
Each event contains a pointer to an OVERLAPPED structure, but the completion port doesn't use that, you can just pass any pointer (or, if you feel better that way, pass a pointer to an OVERLAPPED followed by your own data).

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"You use printf(or std::cout, which is the same), which is internally locked by a critical section". Please explain this line. Do you mean the cost of calling "cout" is more than pushing/popping an element or this means that two threads cant use console screen to print messages simultaneously? Thanks i almost reached there. –  user1960154 Jan 28 '13 at 14:01
    
Calling any such function as e.g. cout or puts from one or several threads on the same console/stdout/whatever does demonstrably not result in gibberish. What goes in as one "unit" comes out as one unit. Though this isn't strictly required by a standard (not under Windows, anyway) you'll never see anything else happening. This necessarily means that either within the CRT or at a lower level, proper synchronization of some kind is done (otherwise this couldn't work!). Therefore, by printing, you acquire and release a critical section, without knowing. –  Damon Jan 28 '13 at 18:35
    
But again, this may accidentially hide your lack of proper synchronization, but it is not sufficient to guarantee that pushing/popping your queue works as intended. It really only guarantees that printing works properly. To be sure that your code works properly (reliably, not by accident!), you most definitively need that critical section in your code (or use a completion port, which does that internally). –  Damon Jan 28 '13 at 18:38

In your particular case, the cout is going to take several hundred times longer than the "get". and you sleep when the queue is empty, which allows the other thread to fill up a lot of the queue before your "consumer" thread is fetching any of it.

Run at full speed (no debug prints, no sleeps), make sure you run for a LONG time, and check the value at the other end with simple math.

Something like this:

int old_val = val;
while(1)
{
    if(!que.empty())
    {
       int  val = que.front();

       que.pop();
       if (old_val+1 != val)
       {
          /// Do something as things have gone wrong!
       }
     }
}

Note that this may also not go wrong immediately/trivially. You want to run it for hours, preferrably with something else running as well on the machine - something like a batch file with:

@echo off
:again 
dir c:\ /s > NUL:
goto again

[It's been a while since I wrote batch-scripts for Windows, so that may not be 100% correct, but I think you should be able to google up the answers for anything I got wrong - the idea is to "intterrupt" the machine].

Also, try running several copies of your pair of threads with a separate queue per pair - that will force more scheduling activity, and may trigger a problem.

Like Anton says, some of these things are often VERY hard to reproduce. I had a problem in a real-time OS where a queue got messed up - the only REAL sign was that the memory eventually ran out during a "stress-test" (which does "random" things, including several different interrupt sources). The OS has been tested in hundreds of units in production testing and was out in the field as real production systems [and the same code running on a different processor was operating telephone switches all over the world, again, without customer complaints about memory leaks], seemingly without memory leaks! But one "hole" in the queue handling, in ONE function, that was only run. After thinking it was the stress test itself that occassionally ran into some strange situation where queues built up, I eventually found the actual problem - an interrupt hitting between the read and write of the queue - a hole of exactly two instructons, and only when an interrupt routine was interrupted by another interrupt routine while sending a message... I'd rather not debug that one again!

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Mats Peterson, if i comment out "cout" lines(as the cost of cout operation is much much more than the cost of pushing or popping an element to/from queue). The codes still runs(though i dont see any thing on console). It does not crashes. I am still worried at this strange behavior. I want you to explain some more regarding this code . –  user1960154 Jan 28 '13 at 13:43
    
So you need to compare your value that you fetch out of the queue with the "expected" value. –  Mats Petersson Jan 28 '13 at 13:45
    
yes i reall do, i want to pop out every element . As evidence i was printing them on screen. one more thingf the integers that are pushed in queue are in exact ascending order(i,i+1,i+2,.....) –  user1960154 Jan 28 '13 at 13:48
    
Yes, but like I said, printing takes 100's of times longer [and may well contain synchronisation to make the other thread run in lockstep with this one]. These things are NOT easy to test for - but my code above should help a bit. And 20k is not a high count for this sort of things. I'd run it until it wraps the integer several times - it may take a few hours, but sure beats trying to figure out what's going wrong when one goes missing in your big program that relies on every queued thing turning up at the other end. –  Mats Petersson Jan 28 '13 at 13:55

One of the greatest problems with the kind of bugs CRITICAL_SECTION prevents is that it's damn hard to reproduce them. You have to anticipate how it could fail without being able to demonstrate it.

When you're protecting your own code instead of wrapping non-thread-safe library calls, you can usually trigger race condition by adding a Sleep to some place. In the code you posted, there is no opportunity to do it for the producer (whatever invariants are broken, it's done inside que.push), and the potential TOCTTOU problem with the consumer checking for empty queue does not exist when there is only one consumer. If we could add Sleep into the queue implementation, then we'd be able to make things go wrong in a predictable way.

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Mats Peterson, I have dual core PC, Simoc yes ExitProcess calls are conditional. This code Works (i have checked it and value of i , the global variable reaches upto 20,000) i dont know how both the threads are accessing same queue without any locking (Critical Section, Semaphore) mechanism –  user1960154 Jan 28 '13 at 13:31

It is possible that the queue code is safe for such pop-polling if there is only one producer and one consumer. If the producer push uses a temp index/pointer to insert the data into the next empty queue position, and only stores the incremented 'temp index' into the queue 'next empty' member, queue.empty could return true until it is safe for the data to be popped by the consumer. Such operation may have been designed in or may arise by accident.

Once you have more than one producer or more than one consumer, it will explode for sure, sooner or later.

Edit - even if the queue turns out to be safe with one producer and one consumer, you shouldn't rely on it unless it's documented - some b***d will change the implementation in the next release :(

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