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I am working on a japanese website and have a hard time finding a font which looks good in japanese. I was surprised that so few fonts seem to exist for japanese. My team has contacted several web font providers without much success. Only one company could offer a web font for japanese but it was 35 megabytes which is far to big for the clients to download to their browsers.

For Latin letters there are a few fonts which one can be quite confident almost all users have, like Arial, Verdana, TNR, Georgia and so on. What fonts equal these in japan?

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Was the 35Mb file really a "web font" (ie woff)? Because woff is compressed and the biggest japanese font file I have is about 7MB. So I struggle to imagine how many (almost certainly useless) glyphs that font is holding –  PandaWood Feb 7 '13 at 0:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Web-font for Japanese, though there are few providers exist, is not really practical as you found the size of the font data is too big to download. Usually Japanese font has 8,000-16,000 glyph so making new fonts means you need to make at least 8,000 glyph, which is pretty heavy task. As a result of it, there are very few variations in Japanese fonts, and Japanese users also about care about fonts less than Latin-character users.

Most Japanese websites use default font sets provided on Windows or Mac. The latest ones are Meiryo and Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro. For older versions such like Windows XP, it is good to add former default fonts MS Gothic(or MS Mincho)/Osaka.

Some old browsers could not understand those font names in English, some others do not recognize the names in Japanese, so it is safe to write both in Japanese and English.

Meiryo and Hiragino's order is, because Mac users may have Meiryo from MS-Office, and Hiragino is more familiar and matching well on Mac, better by starting Hiragino series.

So the current recommended practice is like this,

font-family:"ヒラギノ角ゴ Pro W3", "Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro",Osaka, "メイリオ", Meiryo, "MS Pゴシック", "MS PGothic", sans-serif;
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Thanks! My client wanted MS PGothic and is very satisfied with being able to use a "standard" font instead of the heavy web font which we tried first. The main problem here is that I wasn't able to test the font, since I wasn't able to "simulate" an asian environment on my swedish or english windows installations. I installed the japanese language pack from MS Update but that didn't help me. So, they are satisfied but I still cannot see what it looks like. We settled for the following style: font-family: 'MS Pゴシック', 'MS PGothic', 'メイリオ', Meiryo, sans-serif; –  Mattias Örtenblad Jan 31 '13 at 9:01
    
I'm not sure it's fair to say that you need to make "at least 8000 glyph" to make a new Japanese font, given the common use (jōyō) kanji number only about 2000. Anyone writing on the internet would be perfectly happy with around 2000? I would. –  PandaWood Feb 7 '13 at 0:46
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Joyo-kanji does not include many letters used for proper noun. Many people can not write their own name within Joyo-kanji. Until 2008, even some prefectures could not be written by Joyo-kanji-set. Joyo-kanji is a kind of guideline and updated by society's demands, but there is no plan to expand to include vast variation of Japanese surnames. Person whose name can not display properly on a website won't be satisfied with the site. –  akky Feb 8 '13 at 1:54
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For example, Hayao Miyazaki's "Hayao" is not in Joyo-kanji. "Rei" in Rei Kawakubo, "Ji" in Seiji Ozawa, "Jo" and "I" in Joi Ito are not in Joyo-kanji. –  akky Feb 8 '13 at 2:13

I am no font/design expert, but just about every Japanese PC should have basic Latin fonts like the ones you mentioned installed, so they will work. But those fonts give a kind of Western look to Japanese characters. If you want to use fonts that Japanese sites typically use I would start by browsing some of the more popular Japanese sites and using things like Firebug or the Chrome developer tools to examine the CSS and see what fonts they reference. For example, yahoo.co.jp currently has this CSS:

font-family: 'MS PGothic', Osaka, Arial, sans-serif;

The "gothic" typeface fonts seem fairly popular these days: on Windows, fonts like MS Gothic, MS PGothic, etc. Ming typeface is also widely used. These are the default browser font settings for Firefox on my Japanese Windows machine:

Japanese Firefox font settings

The proportional font is the sans-serif font, which is MS PGothic, serif font is MS PMing, and the monospace font is MS Gothic.

BTW, the "Osaka" font is apparently a standard font on Japanese Macs. At my work we generally use a similar font-family setting like the one from Yahoo.co.jp.

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Thanks! My client wanted MS PGothic and is very satisfied with being able to use a "standard" font instead of the heavy web font which we tried first. The main problem here is that I wasn't able to test the font, since I wasn't able to "simulate" an asian environment on my swedish or english windows installations. I installed the japanese language pack from MS Update but that didn't help me. So, they are satisfied but I still cannot see what it looks like. We settled for the following style: font-family: 'MS Pゴシック', 'MS PGothic', 'メイリオ', Meiryo, sans-serif; –  Mattias Örtenblad Jan 31 '13 at 9:01

Fonts don't really have to be "web fonts" (woff) to be used on the web. I use several of these on my website:

But here are some free Japanese web-fonts (that I also use):

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