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I am currently playing around with the python-jabberbot and am having trouble creating a simple method which sends a random sentence. I am not proficient in python so I am wondering where I am going wrong. I have a feeling the way I am declaring the array is my downfall:

def whatdoyouknow(self, mess, args):
        """random response"""   
        string[0] = 'this is a longish sentence about things'
        string[1] = 'this is a longish sentence about things number 2'
        string[2] = 'this is a longish sentence about things number 3'

        i = random.randint(0, 2)
        return string[i]
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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You define a list literal by putting the elements in square brackets:

string = ['this is a longish sentence about things',
          'this is a longish sentence about things number 2',
          'this is a longish sentence about things number 3']

Alternatively, you build the list by defining an empty list, then appending the elements:

string = []
string.append('this is a longish sentence about things')
string.append('this is a longish sentence about things number 2')
string.append('this is a longish sentence about things number 3')

I strongly recommend you read the Python tutorial before continuing, it explains building python types and how to manipulate them for you.

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Ah thank you very much –  Switchkick Jan 28 '13 at 13:30
1  
@Switchkick -- As a side note, in your example, you could use a tuple as well. In that case, replace the square brackets with parenthesis. But, definitely read the tutorial ... That will make is more clear the difference between list and tuple types (One difference being that you can't .append to a tuple). –  mgilson Jan 28 '13 at 13:35

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