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I'm using the NetworkX library to work with some small- to medium-sized unweighted, unsigned, directed graphs representing usage of a Web 2.0 site (smallest graph: less than two dozen nodes, largest: a few thousand). One of the things I want to calculate is eigenvector centrality, as follows:

>>> eig = networkx.eigenvector_centrality(my_graph)
>>> eigs = [(v,k) for k,v in eig.iteritems()]
>>> eigs.sort()
>>> eigs.reverse() 

However, this gives unexpected results: nodes with 0 outdegree but receiving inward arcs from very central nodes appear at the very back of the list with 0.0 eigenvector centrality (not being a mathematician I may have got this confused, but I don't think that outward arcs should make any difference to a node's centrality to a directed graph). In the course of investigating these results, I noticed from the documentation that NetworkX calculates 'right' eigenvector centrality by default; out of curiosity, I decided to calculate 'left' eigenvector centrality by the recommended method, i.e. reversing the graph before calculating eigenvector centrality (see Networkx documentation). To my surprise, I got exactly the same result: every node was calculated to have exactly the same eigenvector centrality as before. I think this should be a very unlikely outcome (see Wikipedia article), but I have since replicated it with all the graphs I'm working with. Can anyone explain to me what I'm doing wrong?

N.B. Using the NetworkX implementation of the PageRank algorithm provides the results I was expecting, i.e. nodes receiving inward arcs from very central nodes have high centrality even if their outdegree is 0. PageRank is usually considered to be a variant of eigenvector centrality (see Wikipedia article).

Edit: following a request from Aric, I have included some data. This is an anonymised version of my smallest graph. (I couldn't post toy data in case the problem is specific to the structure of my graphs.) Running the code below on my machine (with Python 2.7) appears to reveal (a) that each node's right and left eigenvector centrality are the same, and (b) that nodes with outdegree 0 invariably also have eigenvector centrality 0, even if they are quite central to the graph as a whole (e.g. node 61).

import networkx

anon_e_list = [(10, 59), (10, 15), (10, 61), (15, 32), (16, 31), (16, 0), (16, 37), (16, 54), (16, 45), (16, 56), (16, 10), (16, 8), (16, 36), (16, 24), (16, 30), (18, 34), (18, 36), (18, 30), (19, 1), (19, 3), (19, 51), (19, 21), (19, 40), (19, 41), (19, 30), (19, 14), (19, 61), (21, 64), (26, 1), (31, 1), (31, 3), (31, 51), (31, 62), (31, 33), (31, 40), (31, 23), (31, 30), (31, 18), (31, 13), (31, 46), (31, 61), (32, 3), (32, 2), (32, 33), (32, 6), (32, 7), (32, 9), (32, 15), (32, 17), (32, 18), (32, 23), (32, 30), (32, 5), (32, 27), (32, 34), (32, 35), (32, 38), (32, 40), (32, 42), (32, 43), (32, 46), (32, 47), (32, 62), (32, 56), (32, 57), (32, 59), (32, 64), (32, 61), (33, 0), (33, 31), (33, 2), (33, 7), (33, 9), (33, 10), (33, 12), (33, 64), (33, 14), (33, 46), (33, 16), (33, 17), (33, 18), (33, 19), (33, 20), (33, 21), (33, 22), (33, 23), (33, 30), (33, 26), (33, 28), (33, 11), (33, 34), (33, 32), (33, 35), (33, 37), (33, 38), (33, 39), (33, 41), (33, 43), (33, 45), (33, 24), (33, 47), (33, 48), (33, 49), (33, 58), (33, 62), (33, 53), (33, 54), (33, 55), (33, 60), (33, 57), (33, 59), (33, 5), (33, 52), (33, 63), (33, 61), (34, 58), (34, 4), (34, 33), (34, 20), (34, 55), (34, 28), (34, 11), (34, 64), (35, 18), (35, 60), (35, 61), (37, 34), (37, 48), (37, 49), (37, 18), (37, 33), (37, 39), (37, 21), (37, 42), (37, 26), (37, 59), (37, 44), (37, 12), (37, 11), (37, 61), (41, 3), (41, 50), (41, 18), (41, 52), (41, 33), (41, 54), (41, 19), (41, 22), (41, 5), (41, 46), (41, 25), (41, 44), (41, 13), (41, 62), (41, 29), (44, 32), (44, 3), (44, 18), (44, 33), (44, 40), (44, 41), (44, 30), (44, 23), (44, 61), (50, 17), (50, 37), (50, 62), (50, 41), (50, 25), (50, 43), (50, 27), (50, 28), (50, 29), (54, 33), (54, 41), (54, 10), (54, 59), (54, 63), (54, 61), (58, 62), (58, 46), (59, 31), (59, 34), (59, 30), (59, 49), (59, 18), (59, 33), (59, 9), (59, 10), (59, 8), (59, 13), (59, 24), (59, 61), (60, 34), (60, 16), (60, 35), (60, 50), (60, 4), (60, 6), (60, 59), (60, 24), (63, 40), (63, 33), (63, 30), (63, 61), (63, 53)]

my_graph = networkx.DiGraph()
my_graph.add_edges_from(anon_e_list)
r_eig = networkx.eigenvector_centrality(my_graph)
my_graph2 = my_graph.reverse()
l_eig = networkx.eigenvector_centrality(my_graph2)

for nd in my_graph.nodes():
    print 'node: {} indegree: {} outdegree: {} right eig: {} left eig: {}'.format(nd,my_graph.in_degree(nd),my_graph.out_degree(nd),r_eig[nd],l_eig[nd])
share|improve this question
    
Could you post more specifically what the problem is? Note that you'll probably get a lot of zeros in eigenvector centrality for nodes that aren't in a strongly connected component with more than 1 node. Eigenvector centrality probably isn't what you want for DiGraphs. –  Aric Jan 29 '13 at 5:14
    
@Aric -- the specific problems are (a) that a node's outward arcs seem to influence its centrality, and (b) that I'm getting exactly the same results for right and left eigenvector centrality, which leads me to suspect that there's something wrong either with the way that NetworkX's eigenvector algorithm handles directed graphs or (more likely) with the way that I'm calling the eigenvector_centrality function. Each graph consists of a single, fairly strongly connected component, though I can't post data here for ethical reasons. Why wouldn't I want eigenvector centrality for a directed graph? –  Westcroft_to_Apse Jan 29 '13 at 15:03
    
You could get all zero eigenvalues with a digraph, e.g. with a directed path. Or the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector could be complex. If you update your code example with a small graph we might be able to figure out your problem. –  Aric Jan 30 '13 at 1:53
    
@Aric okay, I've added some data now. As you'll be able to see now, I'm not getting all zero eigenvalues. What are the consequences if the largest eigenvector is complex? Any help or explanation will be much appreciated. –  Westcroft_to_Apse Jan 31 '13 at 12:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

These two lines

my_graph2 = my_graph.copy()
my_graph2.reverse()

should be replaced with

my_graph2 = my_graph.reverse()

since the reverse() method by default returns a copy of the graph.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Aric. I assumed that the reverse method of a graph would work like the reverse method of a list, which returns None. –  Westcroft_to_Apse Jan 31 '13 at 15:32
    
If anyone's interested to know this, I've now established that the problem with outdegree influencing eigenvector centrality is overcome by using the 'left' eigenvector instead of the 'right' eigenvector. It would be kind of neat if this was explained somewhere, but at least it's here now. –  Westcroft_to_Apse Jan 31 '13 at 15:48
    
The reverse method does an in-place operation if you use reverse(copy=False). –  Aric Feb 1 '13 at 1:47
    
Thanks again. (And while I'm at it, thanks also for PyGraphViz, which I use extensively.) I wonder if something could be put in the NetworkX docs mentioning this practical difference between 'right' and 'left' eigenvectors, though? (I.e. that one takes account of outgoing and the other of incoming arcs.) For a non-mathematician, that isn't obvious - and it's not generally mentioned in social network analysis papers; instead, the authors typically just say 'eigenvector centrality' without explaining that they implicitly mean 'left eigenvector centrality'. –  Westcroft_to_Apse Feb 1 '13 at 9:09
    
You can suggest NetworkX documention changes by opening an issue at github.com/networkx/networkx/issues –  Aric Feb 1 '13 at 19:57

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