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 class a
 {
 public:
 a() : b(5), a1(10) //will firstly initialize a1 then b, so order here doesn't matter
 int a1;
 private:
 int b;
 }

The question is how to change the order (to have b initialized before a1)? I must have public members above private so that solution isn't okay for me. Of course here I use ints, the problem is more complex but it's just an example which shows what is my problem.

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1  
What are you ACTUALLY trying to achieve? It would probably be better if you provided the real code, even if it's more complex. [I think the answer is "you can't", however]. –  Mats Petersson Jan 28 '13 at 14:41
6  
Any sensibly draconian "style rule" that forces you to place public members before private ones should also prohibit public data members. –  Kerrek SB Jan 28 '13 at 14:42
    
Your question is "How can I change the order my members are declared in without changing the order my members are declared in?" which is a silly question –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 28 '13 at 15:37
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand you correct you have some kind of style guide saying that public members should be before private.

In that case I would suggest you declare all your member variables private and create accessor functions to them instead. That way you get around it.

class a
 {
 public:
   a() : _a1(5), _b(10) 
   int a1() const { return _a1; }
   void a1(int value) { _a1 = value; }
   int b() const { return _b; }
   void b(int value) { _b = value; }

 private:
   int _a1;
   int _b;
 }

any sane compiler will anyway optimize it so the overhead will be minimal.

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2  
Aka the "prevent hangnails by cutting off your hand" approach. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 28 '13 at 15:16
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You cannot change the order of initialization, that is always defined by the order of declaration of the members in your class. This is necessary because the order of destruction must be the inverse of the order of construction, and if you changed the order of construction, the compiler would be forced to keep track of which order you have initialized your members in in order to generate proper destruction sequences.

So my advice is:

  1. Just live with it, and;
  2. Do not depend on the order of construction of your member variables.

To achieve point 2), you can provide default constructors for your members to do default initialization, and then initialize your members properly in the order you want inside the body of your constructor (in other words, decouple construction from logical initialization).

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The order of initialization is determined by the order of declaration of the member variables. So if you want b to be initialized before a, you have to declare it before.

class a
{
  public:
   a() : b(5), a1(10) {}
  private:
   int b;
  public:
   int a1;
};
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But the problem is that I need to have private members after the public members. That's why I'm looking for another way. –  user1873947 Jan 28 '13 at 14:42
    
@user1873947 why do you need that particular ordering? –  juanchopanza Jan 28 '13 at 14:43
    
that is the rule of coding style my project uses. –  user1873947 Jan 28 '13 at 14:44
    
@user1873947: then do not introduce dependencies from the order of construction –  Andy Prowl Jan 28 '13 at 14:45
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Make your b object private, declared it before a1, and make an accessor function for accessing the content of b. [If necessary, make it return a reference to the b object, so the calling code can modify it - although that is quite clearly bad design to expose the internals of a class to the calling code, whether it's through a public declaration or through returning a reference]

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It's not that bad design if we are talking about properties. –  user1873947 Jan 28 '13 at 14:53
    
It is bad design according to most OO guidelines to expose the implementation of any object. But there are cases where "bad design" is better than some of the other alternatives. Either way, in this case, you'll have to live with something breaking some rule - and if the rule is "no public data declared before private data", then you will have to do something else, clearly [or redesign so yu don't depend on initialization order, of course].; –  Mats Petersson Jan 28 '13 at 15:00
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