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I want to sort a list with the help of IComparable<T>.CompareTo for a type T called Path. I wrote

var shortest = new List<Path>();
//Fill shortest with elements != null
if (shortest.Contains(null))
      throw new System.Exception("Path is null");
shortest.Sort();
if (shortest.Contains(null))
      throw new System.Exception("Path is null");

To my surprise, the method

    int IComparable<Path>.CompareTo(Path other)
    {
        if (other == null)
            return -1;

        if (!other.valid)
            return 1;

        if (pfad.Count() > other.pfad.Count())
        {
            return -1;
        }
        else if (pfad.Count() < other.pfad.Count())
        {
            return 1;
        }
        else
        {
            if (length > other.length)
                return -1;
            else
                return 1;

        }

    }

from the class

 public class Path : IComparable<Path>

is called from Sort() with other==null. I am even more surprised that in the first code-block, the second exception is thrown, meaning that shortest contains a null value after the sort and not before.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have a custom equality comparer? Does your list of paths contain a null value? –  Jeroen Jan 28 '13 at 14:50
    
there is a similar question on SO.. stackoverflow.com/questions/6189750/… –  Amitd Jan 28 '13 at 14:52
    
I do not see the similarity. My question is: Why does Sort compare some value to null if my list never contains the value null? –  JF Meier Jan 28 '13 at 14:58
    
Are you asking why IComparable needs to be able to compare to null or why your code seems to be sorting a list that contains a null item when it should be throwing an exception? –  D Stanley Jan 28 '13 at 15:00
    
The second thing: If the list does not contain null, why does Sort() call CompareTo with other==null ? –  JF Meier Jan 28 '13 at 15:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your CompareTo function is broken. It doesn't return 0 when an object is compared to itself and it always returns 1 when two objects with valid == false are compared. So there might be two objectsa and b with a.CompareTo(b) == 1 and b.CompareTo(a) == 1 and this might lead to Sort() behave strangely.

Also, as already noted in the other answer, it should return 1 if other == null. (shouldn't really matter when the list doesen't contain null)

share|improve this answer
    
You're right. I still do not understand the behaviour of the sort function, but if I rewrite it using Sort(Comparison<T>), it works. –  JF Meier Jan 28 '13 at 15:43

While I cannot explain why Sort needs to compare to null, the documentation of IComparable.CompareTo explicitly states:

By definition, any object compares greater than (or follows) null, and two null references compare equal to each other.

As such, whatever the reason is, the implementation of CompareTo has to follow this and the other rules to ensure compatibility with Sort() et al.

share|improve this answer
    
"the implementation of CompareTo has to follow this", well, no, it doesn't. Nothing prevents you from violating that; it's just a convention, not a requirement (and a rather poor convention at that). –  Servy Jan 28 '13 at 15:03
    
Except library methods that use CompareTo often assume that they follow these conventions and may therefore behave unexpectedly if such is not the case. As such, you don't have to follow them per se, but not doing so may lead to issues with said methods. –  Smallhacker Jan 28 '13 at 15:07
    
I've never come across a problem as a result of this. There may be certain implementations of say, sort, or whatever other algorithm using comparisons, that may not call CompareTo at all on null values, and instead assume that null is "first", in which case it wouldn't matter what your solution did. If they don't, then it will work just fine. –  Servy Jan 28 '13 at 15:16

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