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My c++ book says this (lippman, c++ primer, fifth ed., p. 508):

The synthesized default constructor is defined as deleted if the class ... has a const member whose type does not explicitly define a default constructor and that member does not have an in-class initializer. (emphesis mine)

Why then does this code produce an error?

class Foo {
  Foo() { }
};

class Bar {
private:
  const Foo foo;
};

int main() {
  Bar f; //error: call to implicitly-deleted default constructor of 'Bar'
  return 0;
}

The rule above seems to indicate that it should not be an error, because Foo does explicitly define a default constructor. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think your quote is relevant here, because Foo does explicitly define a default constructor. It is not true that the quote says that your code is OK. –  Kerrek SB Jan 28 '13 at 14:58
    
@KerrekSB you're right, but then the book must be omitting some other rules I should also know about, because none of the other rules mention anything relevant about the default constructor. (there are 4 rules on when the copy control members and the default constructor are deleted.) –  user2015453 Jan 28 '13 at 14:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

To fix your error. You need to make Foo::Foo() public.

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo() { }
};

Otherwise I do believe it is private.

Is this what your looking for?

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, my bad! Thanks. –  user2015453 Jan 28 '13 at 15:04
    
No problem, pleasure to help. –  Xathereal Jan 28 '13 at 15:04
1  
Also, the Bar class needs a constructor, otherwise it doesn't know how to initialize the private foo member. –  Gang Yin Jan 28 '13 at 15:09
    
@GangYin Isn't foo supposed to be just default-initialized i.e. use the Foo's default constructor by default? –  user2015453 Jan 28 '13 at 15:12
    
@user2015453, I just get that from c++ primer 5th edition : "we must use constructor initializer list to provide values for members that are CONST, reference, or of a class type that doesn't have a default constructor." –  Gang Yin Jan 29 '13 at 1:28

I think that this should work

class Foo {
  public:
  Foo() { }
};

class Bar {
public:
  Bar() : foo() {}
private:
  const Foo foo;
};
share|improve this answer

The default constructor is omitted when a a class construction isn't trivial.

That in general means that either there is an explicit constructor that receives parameters (and then you can't assume that it can be constructed without those parameters)

Or if one of the members or base classes need to be initiated in construction (They themselves don't have a trivial constructor)

share|improve this answer
    
But if Foo has no explicit constructor, why is the construction of Bar not considered trivial (and thus skipped/deleted)? Foo is pretty trivial, with or without this explicit constructor, which actually does nothing! –  user2015453 Jan 28 '13 at 15:10

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