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The solutions I have found so far in my research on comparing lists of objects have usually generated a new list of objects, say of those items existing in one list, but not in the other. In my case, I want to compare two lists to discover the items whose key exists in one list and not the other (comparing both ways), and for those keys found in both lists, checking whether the value is the same or different.

The object being compared has multiple properites that constitute the key, plus a property that constitutes the value, and finally, an enum property that describes the result of the comparison, e.g., {Equal, NotEqual, NoMatch, NotYetCompared}. So my object might look like:

class MyObject
{
   //Key combination
   string columnA;
   string columnB;
   decimal columnC;

   //The Value
   decimal columnD;

   //Enum for comparison, used for styling the item (value hidden from UI)
   //Alternatively...this could be a string type, holding the enum.ToString()
   MyComparisonEnum result;
}

These objects are collected into two ObservableCollection<MyObject> to be compared. When bound to the UI, the grid rows are being styled based on the caomparison result enum, so the user can easily see what keys are in the new dataset but not in the old, vice-versa, along with those keys in both datasets with a different value. Both lists are presented in the UI in data grids, with the rows styled based on the comparison result.

Would LINQ be suitable as a tool to solve this efficiently, or should I use loops to scan the lists and break out when the key is found, etc (a solution like this comes naturally to be from my procedural programming background)... or some other method?

Thank you!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use Except and Intersect:

var list1 = new List<MyObject>();
var list2 = new List<MyObject>();
// initialization code 
var notIn2 = list1.Except(list2);
var notIn1 = list2.Except(list1);
var both = list1.Intersect(list2);

To find objects with different values (ColumnD) you can use this (quite efficient) Linq query:

var diffValue = from o1 in list1
                join o2 in list2
                on new { o1.columnA, o1.columnB, o1.columnC } equals new { o2.columnA, o2.columnB, o2.columnC }
                where o1.columnD != o2.columnD
                select new { Object1 = o1, Object2 = o2 };

foreach (var diff in diffValue)
{
    MyObject obj1 = diff.Object1;
    MyObject obj2 = diff.Object2;
    Console.WriteLine("Obj1-Value:{0} Obj2-Value:{1}", obj1.columnD, obj2.columnD);
}

when you override Equals and GetHashCode appropriately:

class MyObject
{
    //Key combination
    string columnA;
    string columnB;
    decimal columnC;

    //The Value
    decimal columnD;

    //Enum for comparison, used for styling the item (value hidden from UI)
    //Alternatively...this could be a string type, holding the enum.ToString()
    MyComparisonEnum result;

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null || !(obj is MyObject)) return false;
        MyObject other = (MyObject)obj;
        return columnA.Equals(other.columnA) && columnB.Equals(other.columnB) && columnC.Equals(other.columnC);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int hash = 19;
        hash = hash + (columnA ?? "").GetHashCode();
        hash = hash + (columnB ?? "").GetHashCode();
        hash = hash + columnC.GetHashCode();
        return hash;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hallo, Tim! Thank you for your suggestion. It seems I must generate new lists as the result of calling methods like Except and Intersect. I was hoping to simply maintain the two original lists and merely update each item's result property. That said, I will try this out and will let you know how it goes. Danke... –  Francis Khoury Jan 28 '13 at 15:39
    
I have just tried implementing the "in list1, not in list2" scenario, and I am happy to discover that I can (evidently) try to use my bound ObservableCollection<MyObject> and update the result property directly. However, if there is one item that can be found in both lists, it is not being detected. I put a break point in the override of the Equals method to try to debug, but it is not being hit. I suppopse that fact is evidence of something else amiss..? –  Francis Khoury Jan 28 '13 at 20:26
    
@FrancisKhoury: You have to set a breakpoint in GetHashCode since that is used first to determine if two object are equal. If two objects return the same hahcode Equals will be used to verify the equality. Hence GetHashCode is the precheck, therefore it should always be implemented efficiently. Have you used my code? –  Tim Schmelter Jan 28 '13 at 20:58
    
Tim, please disregard my comment, it was a problem with data, which I was able to debug when getting the result. Your suggestion is working, and I will happily mark this as a good answer! Thank you for your time; I hope I get good enough with this stuff to return the favor sometime. –  Francis Khoury Jan 28 '13 at 21:02

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