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I have written a program in which i use C++ stl set. There is a struct event from which the set is being constructed, and its corresponding binary predicate.. struct comp to define the ordering between them in the set.

The code portion looks as follows:

struct event
{
    int s;
    int f;
    int w;
    set<event,comp>::iterator nxt;
};
struct comp
{
    bool operator()(event a, event b)
    {
        if(a.f!=b.f)
            return a.f<b.f;
        else
        {
            if(a.s!=b.s)
                return a.s<b.s;
            else
                return a.w>b.w;
        }
    }
};

set< event , comp > S;

The problem I am facing here is which struct to write first? I have tried forward-declaring both the structs. I have compiler errors in both the cases.

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1  
What is the problem with this order? It looks fine to me. –  Gorpik Jan 28 '13 at 15:08
    
You can either try set<event*> and use pointers or declare comp first. Set will need to know the size of comp internally. –  Xathereal Jan 28 '13 at 15:09
1  
what's myComp? shouldn't it be comp? –  Andy Prowl Jan 28 '13 at 15:11
1  
and what problem are you having with this? Do you mean you want to declare nxt as set<event, comp> as well? –  Andy Prowl Jan 28 '13 at 15:13
1  
The code in the question is undefined behavior. Within the class definition the type is considered incomplete, and it is undefined behavior to use an incomplete type with the standard library (unless otherwise noted in the standard, which is not the case in set). The particular issue is with: struct X { std::set<X,whatever> s; };, you cannot have a set<X,whatever> as a member of X. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 28 '13 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to include both the definitions before you create the std::set object:

std::set<event,myComp> S;

Forward declarations won't work for you because once you forward declare a type it becomes an incomplete type and in this case the compiler needs to know the layout and size of both the types. Incomplete types work only when the compiler does not need to know the size or the layout of the type for e.x: pointer to the type, since all pointers have same size.

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@nitish712: If you read the answer carefully, You can see that it answers your question. If you understand why? then you won't have to ask the Q. –  Alok Save Jan 28 '13 at 15:16
    
..I know what you said in your answer. But, what I ask is how to overcome this problem. and I got the answer from rasmus.. no offence anyways..:) :) –  nitish712 Jan 28 '13 at 15:23
    
@nitish712: No offence too but Can you not show atleast a little application of what you learned from the answer? Thanks to folks like you it is really annoying to see SO turning in to just another Do my homework forum. –  Alok Save Jan 28 '13 at 15:26
2  
@nitish712: You got an answer from rasmus, but his answer is Undefined Behavior. It might compile and work for you in your current environment, or fail in subtle ways in your environment or when compiling in other environments... Alok is correct: you cannot have a set<event,comp> as a member of event. You can have std::set<event*,comp> (with a different definition of comp that will dereference before comparing), but not a std::set<event,comp>. The specifics are in 17.6.4.8p2 in the standard. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 28 '13 at 15:35
    
@alock save You both were right!! Its so meaningless to declare a struct that way... i better change my code..:) –  nitish712 Jan 28 '13 at 16:07

You can do it like this. Note the use of references.

struct event;
struct comp
{
    bool operator()(const event& a, const event& b);
}
struct event
{
    int s;
    int f;
    int w;
    set<event,comp>::iterator nxt;
};
bool comp::operator()(const event& a, const event& b)
{
    if(a.f!=b.f)
        return a.f<b.f;
    else
    {
        if(a.s!=b.s)
            return a.s<b.s;
        else
            return a.w>b.w;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Ha, more or less what I wrote a minute after. Anyway, even though the use of references is right here, this would also work with value parameters. Function parameters can have incomplete types when you declare the function. –  Gorpik Jan 28 '13 at 15:22
1  
This is still undefined behavior (according to the standard) as you cannot use an incomplete type to instantiate a template in the library and event is incomplete within it's own definition (you cannot have std::set<event, as a member of event) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 28 '13 at 15:32

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