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I'm new to list and I have a problem with the method below: the problem is: java.lang.NullPointerException

Code:

public static List<Integer> input(List<Integer> l)
{
        Node<Integer> pos=l.getFirst();
        System.out.println("Enter num (!=999)");
        int x = reader.nextInt();
        l.insert(null, x);
        while(x!=999)
        {
                System.out.println("Enter num (!=999)");
                l.insert(pos, x);
                pos = pos.getNext();
        }

        return l;
}

Silly me I forgot the input message inside the while...

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1  
What line does the error message occur on? –  mellamokb Jan 28 '13 at 15:14
    
in pos = pos.getNext(); –  user1763240 Jan 28 '13 at 15:15
    
You need to post some more code. Where have you initialized reader? –  Rohit Jain Jan 28 '13 at 15:15
    
I don't think that the problem is with the input. I've already written "static Scanner reader = new Scanner(System.in);" –  user1763240 Jan 28 '13 at 15:17
1  
There is not such method as getFirst in List interface. What implementation are you using? –  Rohit Jain Jan 28 '13 at 15:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you initialized l as an empty list, then the call to

Node<Integer> pos=l.getFirst();

would return null. Then later, you call pos.getNext(); on a null instance, hence the NullPointerException. One way to fix this would be to handle the possibility of the empty list inside your while loop, like this:

while (x != 999)
{
    System.out.println("Enter num (!=999)");
    l.insert(pos, x);
    if (pos == null)
        pos = l.getFirst();
    else
        pos = pos.getNext();
}

When you run this, you'll see the second problem in your code, which you should be able to resolve.

Good luck!

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Two posibilities:

  1. your "pos" reference is null (you can check for that)
  2. the "pos" object contains a NULL object, which the compiler then tries to aotobox to a primitive type somewhere (the Node thing is declared as Integer object type)

SO: check for null before trying to access "pos", AND use "Integer" object when declaring stuff as such.

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