Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I could do this in any other language, but with Bash I've looked far and wide and could not find the answer.

I need to manually increase $line in a script. Example:

for line in `cat file`
do
foo()
       foo_loop(condition)
{
 do_something_to_line($line) 
}
done

If you notice, every time the foo_loop iterates, $line stays the same. I need to iterate $line there, and make sure the original for loop only runs the number of lines in file.

I have thought about finding the number of lines in file using a different loop and iterating the line variable inside the inner loop of foo().

Any ideas?

EDIT:

Sorry for being so vague.

Here we go:

I'm trying to make a section of my code execute multiple times (parallel execution)

Function foo() # Does something
for line in `cat $temp_file`;
foo($line)

That code works just fine, because foo is just taking in the value of line; but if I wanted to do this:

Function foo() # Does something
for line in `cat $temp_file`;
while (some condition)
foo($line)
end

$line will equal the same value throughout the while loop. I need it to change with the while loop, then continue when it goes back to the for. Example:

line = Hi
foo{ echo "$line" }; 
for line in `cat file`;
while ( number_of_processes_running -lt max_number_allowed)
foo($line)
end

If the contents of file were

Hi \n Bye \n Yellow \n Green \n

The output of the example program would be (if max number allowed was 3)

Hi Hi Hi Bye Bye Bye Yellow Yellow Yellow Green Green Green.

Where I want it to be

Hi Bye Yellow Green 

I hope this is better. I'm doing my best to explain my problem.

share|improve this question
    
I think we need a clearer example of what you're trying to accomplish. foo() appears to define a shell function within a loop, which I'm not sure is what you want. –  Jim Garrison Sep 21 '09 at 20:16

3 Answers 3

Instead of using a for loop to read through the file you should maybe read through the file like so.

#!bin/bash

while read line
do
    do_something_to_line($line)
done < "your.file"
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this will not quite work for lines with backslashes (read removes them) and leading and/or trailing whitespace (removed as well). The proper way is to use read -r line to avoid the backslash removal and to set IFS= to avoid the whitespace removal. –  Jens Aug 27 '11 at 9:15

Long story short, while read line; do _____ ; done

Then, make sure you have double-quotes around "$line" so that a parameter isn't delimited by spaces.

Example:

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo | md5sum
c2eb5696e59948852f66a82993016e5a *-

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo | while read line; do echo "$line"; done | md5sum
c2eb5696e59948852f66a82993016e5a *-

Second example # add .gz to every file in the current directory: # If any files had spaces, the mv command for that line would return an error.

$ find -type f -maxdepth 1 | while read line; do mv "$line" "$line.gz"; done
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for the useless use of cat. Did you know you can redirect into compound commands as well? while read ...; do ...; done < file works. –  Jens Aug 27 '11 at 9:18

You should post follow-ups as edits to your question or in comments rather than as an answer.

This structure:

while read line
do
    for (( i=1; i<$max_number_allowed; i++ ))
    do
        foo $line
    done
done < file

Yields:

Hi
Hi
Hi
Bye
Bye
Bye
...etc.

While this one:

for (( i=1; i<$max_number_allowed; i++ ))
do
    while read line
    do
        foo $line
    done < file
done

Yields:

Hi
Bye
Yellow
Green
Hi
Bye
Yellow
Green
...etc.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.