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I know sometimes innerException is null

So the following might fail:

 repEvent.InnerException = ex.InnerException.Message;

Is there a quick ternary way to check if innerException is null or not?

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1  
You might wish to revisit your accepted answer. jrista's answer is better than the others, because an InnerException can have its own InnerException. – Kyralessa Sep 21 '09 at 20:19
4  
Keep in mind that ToString walks through the inner exceptions and combines them for you. This can be a handy short-cut when logging. – Steven Sudit Sep 21 '09 at 20:22

11 Answers 11

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Is this what you are looking for?

String innerMessage = (ex.InnerException != null) 
                      ? ex.InnerException.Message
                      : "";
share|improve this answer
    
Also, is it just me, or would it look a bit cleaner if the arguments were flipped and the != changed to ==. – Noldorin Sep 21 '09 at 20:12
1  
@Noldorin - Sorry dude, I answered this and didn't check to see if I was first! @JL - Noldorin was the first out of the chute with the correct answer, please transfer the accepted answer to him. – Andrew Hare Sep 21 '09 at 20:17
    
@Andrew: Heh, no need to apologise. :) I'm not one to be upset over the issue of a trivial matter, I was just curious as to JL's reason mainly. – Noldorin Sep 21 '09 at 20:23
    
Works but not for multiple nested exceptions – krystan honour Aug 7 '13 at 14:06

Great answers so far. On a similar, but different note, sometimes there is more than one level of nested exceptions. If you want to get the root exception that was originally thrown, no matter how deep, you might try this:

public static class ExceptionExtensions
{
    public static Exception GetOriginalException(this Exception ex)
    {
        if (ex.InnerException == null) return ex;

        return ex.InnerException.GetOriginalException();
    }
}

And in use:

repEvent.InnerException = ex.GetOriginalException();
share|improve this answer
    
Am I missing something here or is ex.GetOriginalException() for innerException not top level ex? – JL. Sep 21 '09 at 20:23
    
I'm not sure what your asking. GetOriginalException will return the original exception that initiated the whole exception chain, regardless of whether there is only one exception (no InnerException at all), or many levels of InnerExceptions. – jrista Sep 21 '09 at 21:15
    
Thanks, this helped me find the InnerException of an exception thrown by EntityFramework. – Blake Mumford Jun 4 '12 at 11:31
    
I am not sure which version of .Net Framework provides GetOriginalException, but all I can see is GetBaseException(). Is that the same? – Antony Sep 21 '12 at 4:07
3  
He's saying you should implement your own method called GetOriginalException. But yes, it would seem GetBaseException() does the same thing. – Justin T Conroy Sep 25 '12 at 10:43

That's funny, I can't find anything wrong with Exception.GetBaseException()?

repEvent.InnerException = ex.GetBaseException().Message;
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Great!, with this you don't have to do a custom method to navigate through all nested exceptions. – armadillo.mx Dec 5 '12 at 17:42

The simplest solution is to use a basic conditional expression:

repEvent.InnerException = ex.InnerException == null ? 
    null : ex.InnerException.Message;
share|improve this answer
    
No problem at all, just that Andrew's code returned a string. – JL. Sep 21 '09 at 20:19
    
@JL: Actually, mind returns a string too. I just assumed from the code that you were calling the string property InnerException (just be confusing?). Never mind though. @Andrew: Thanks. And though I don't at all mind, +1 to yours for the courtesy. – Noldorin Sep 21 '09 at 20:25
    
@Nordorin, Ah I see where the issue comes in, I've gone string because exceptions don't serialize well (if they do at all). – JL. Sep 21 '09 at 20:58
    
@JL: Exceptions that come with the .NET framework serialize fine, as all of them have a deserialization constructor. Custom exceptions may not serialize properly, but it is easy enough to add a deserialization constructor and override GetObjectData. Third-party extensions could be made serializable with a serialization surrogate. – jrista Sep 22 '09 at 2:17

Why so much recursion in these answers?

public static class ExceptionExtensions
{
    public static Exception GetOriginalException(this Exception ex)
    {
        while(ex.InnerException != null)ex = ex.InnerException;
        return ex;
    }
}

Seems like a much more straight forward way to implement this.

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Its an old question but for future readers:

In addition to the answers already posted I think the correct way to do this (when you can have more than one InnerException) is Exception.GetBaseException Method

If you want the exception instance you should do this:

repEvent.InnerException = ex.GetBaseException();

If you are only looking for the message this way:

repEvent.InnerException = ex.GetBaseException().Message;
share|improve this answer

Sometimes also InnerException has an InnerException, so you can use a recursive function for it:

public string GetInnerException(Exception ex)
{
     if (ex.InnerException != null)
     {
        return string.Format("{0} > {1} ", ex.InnerException.Message, GetInnerException(ex.InnerException));
     }
   return string.Empty;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm all for digging down to the oldest exception, but there's really no reason to recurse here. Just loop while inner exception is not null. – Steven Sudit Sep 21 '09 at 20:21
    
Is recursion evil or something? – tster Sep 21 '09 at 20:52
    
E.g. in Entity Framework are usefully exceptions deep inside. – Jan Remunda Sep 22 '09 at 6:09
    
Recursion isn't evil, but it can be expensive, so if you don't need it, don't use it. In the case of inner exceptions, you have no need to keep pushing the current state onto a stack so that you can continue where you left off, so why use recursion and pay this price? There are also cases where recursion is much, much slower than regular iteration, such as calculating the Fib series. – Steven Sudit Sep 22 '09 at 10:07
    
Sweet! I added this as an extension method to be available project-wide – Korayem Jul 27 '11 at 10:34

With C# 6.0 you can use:

string message = exception.InnerException?.Message ?? "";

This line of code is similar to:

string message = exception.InnerException == null ? "" : exception.InnerException.Message.

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty67wk28.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jerrynixon/archive/2014/02/26/at-last-c-is-getting-sometimes-called-the-safe-navigation-operator.aspx

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Yes:

if (ex.InnerException == null) {
    // then it's null
}
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Here is another possible implementation that appends the messages and stack traces so we get them full:

private static Tuple<string, string> GetFullExceptionMessageAndStackTrace(Exception exception)
{
    if (exception.InnerException == null)
    {
        if (exception.GetType() != typeof(ArgumentException))
        {
            return new Tuple<string, string>(exception.Message, exception.StackTrace);
        }
        string argumentName = ((ArgumentException)exception).ParamName;
        return new Tuple<string, string>(String.Format("{0} With null argument named '{1}'.", exception.Message, argumentName ), exception.StackTrace);
    }
    Tuple<string, string> innerExceptionInfo = GetFullExceptionMessageAndStackTrace(exception.InnerException);
    return new Tuple<string, string>(
    String.Format("{0}{1}{2}", innerExceptionInfo.Item1, Environment.NewLine, exception.Message),
    String.Format("{0}{1}{2}", innerExceptionInfo.Item2, Environment.NewLine, exception.StackTrace));
}


[Fact]
public void RecursiveExtractingOfExceptionInformationOk()
{
    // Arrange
    Exception executionException = null;
    var iExLevelTwo = new NullReferenceException("The test parameter is null");
    var iExLevelOne = new ArgumentException("Some test meesage", "myStringParamName", iExLevelTwo);
    var ex = new Exception("Some higher level message",iExLevelOne);

    // Act 
    var exMsgAndStackTrace = new Tuple<string, string>("none","none");
    try
    {
        exMsgAndStackTrace = GetFullExceptionMessageAndStackTrace(ex);
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        executionException = exception;
    }

    // Assert
    Assert.Null(executionException);

    Assert.True(exMsgAndStackTrace.Item1.Contains("The test parameter is null"));
    Assert.True(exMsgAndStackTrace.Item1.Contains("Some test meesage"));
    Assert.True(exMsgAndStackTrace.Item1.Contains("Some higher level message"));
    Assert.True(exMsgAndStackTrace.Item1.Contains("myStringParamName"));

    Assert.True(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(exMsgAndStackTrace.Item2));

    Console.WriteLine(exMsgAndStackTrace.Item1);
    Console.WriteLine(exMsgAndStackTrace.Item2);
}
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class MyException : Exception
{
    private const string AMP = "\r\nInnerException: ";
    public override string Message
    {
        get
        {
            return this.InnerException != null ? base.Message + AMP + this.InnerException.Message : base.Message;
        }
    }

    public override string StackTrace
    {
        get
        {
            return this.InnerException != null ? base.StackTrace + AMP + this.InnerException.StackTrace : base.StackTrace;
        }
    }
}
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