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I would like to retrieve a random word from a file using python, but I do not believe my following method is best or efficient. Please assist.

import fileinput
import _random
file = [line for line in fileinput.input("/etc/dictionaries-common/words")]
rand = _random.Random()
print file[int(rand.random() * len(file))],
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2  
Do note that, although you ought to use open() instead in most cases, file() is still a Python built-in function (for Python 2.x), and probably shouldn't be used as a variable name. –  Triptych Sep 21 '09 at 20:40
    
Most of these solutions do not work in Python 3. –  kzh Sep 22 '09 at 1:21
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9 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The random module defines choice(), which does what you want:

import random

words = [line.strip() for line in open('/etc/dictionaries-common/words')]
print(random.choice(words))

Note also that this assumes that each word is by itself on a line in the file. If the file is very big, or if you perform this operation frequently, you may find that constantly rereading the file impacts your application's performance negatively.

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3  
Considering the word "efficient" was used in the question, loading up the entire file looks like it misses the point, even if it is the most Pythonic method available. –  Oli Sep 21 '09 at 20:29
    
Neat...never heard of random.choice() before...now get back to work ;) –  jimmyorr Sep 21 '09 at 20:30
1  
@Oli If you have no assumptions about the bytes per word, you have to read the whole file in order to know where the words are. –  bayer Sep 21 '09 at 20:40
    
How do I edit this answer? The strip is not necessary. –  kzh Sep 21 '09 at 22:42
    
Argh. Does not work in python3. –  kzh Sep 21 '09 at 22:49
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Another solution is to use getline

import linecache
import random
line_number = random.randint(0, total_num_lines)
linecache.getline('/etc/dictionaries-common/words', line_number)

From the documentation:

The linecache module allows one to get any line from any file, while attempting to optimize internally, using a cache, the common case where many lines are read from a single file

EDIT: You can calculate the total number once and store it, since the dictionary file is unlikely to change.

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How would I know what the total number of lines is with this method? –  kzh Sep 21 '09 at 20:49
    
You can calculate the total number once and store it, since the dictionary file is unlikely to change. –  Nadia Alramli Sep 21 '09 at 20:52
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>>> import random
>>> random.choice(list(open('/etc/dictionaries-common/words')))
'jaundiced\n'

It is efficient human-time-wise.

btw, your implementation coincides with the one from stdlib's random.py:

 def choice(self, seq):
    """Choose a random element from a non-empty sequence."""
    return seq[int(self.random() * len(seq))]

Measure time performance

I was wondering what is the relative performance of the presented solutions. linecache-based is the obvious favorite. How much slower is the random.choice's one-liner compared to honest algorithm implemented in select_random_line()?

# nadia_known_num_lines   9.6e-06 seconds 1.00
# nadia                   0.056 seconds 5843.51
# jfs                     0.062 seconds 1.10
# dcrosta_no_strip        0.091 seconds 1.48
# dcrosta                 0.13 seconds 1.41
# mark_ransom_no_strip    0.66 seconds 5.10
# mark_ransom_choose_from 0.67 seconds 1.02
# mark_ransom             0.69 seconds 1.04

(Each function is called 10 times (cached performance)).

These result show that simple solution (dcrosta) is faster in this case than a more deliberate one (mark_ransom).

Code that was used for comparison (as a gist):

import linecache
import random
from timeit import default_timer


WORDS_FILENAME = "/etc/dictionaries-common/words"


def measure(func):
    measure.func_to_measure.append(func)
    return func
measure.func_to_measure = []


@measure
def dcrosta():
    words = [line.strip() for line in open(WORDS_FILENAME)]
    return random.choice(words)


@measure
def dcrosta_no_strip():
    words = [line for line in open(WORDS_FILENAME)]
    return random.choice(words)


def select_random_line(filename):
    selection = None
    count = 0
    for line in file(filename, "r"):
        if random.randint(0, count) == 0:
            selection = line.strip()
            count = count + 1
    return selection


@measure
def mark_ransom():
    return select_random_line(WORDS_FILENAME)


def select_random_line_no_strip(filename):
    selection = None
    count = 0
    for line in file(filename, "r"):
        if random.randint(0, count) == 0:
            selection = line
            count = count + 1
    return selection


@measure
def mark_ransom_no_strip():
    return select_random_line_no_strip(WORDS_FILENAME)


def choose_from(iterable):
    """Choose a random element from a finite `iterable`.

    If `iterable` is a sequence then use `random.choice()` for efficiency.

    Return tuple (random element, total number of elements)
    """
    selection, i = None, None
    for i, item in enumerate(iterable):
        if random.randint(0, i) == 0:
            selection = item

    return selection, (i+1 if i is not None else 0)


@measure
def mark_ransom_choose_from():
    return choose_from(open(WORDS_FILENAME))


@measure
def nadia():
    global total_num_lines
    total_num_lines = sum(1 for _ in open(WORDS_FILENAME))

    line_number = random.randint(0, total_num_lines)
    return linecache.getline(WORDS_FILENAME, line_number)


@measure
def nadia_known_num_lines():
    line_number = random.randint(0, total_num_lines)
    return linecache.getline(WORDS_FILENAME, line_number)


@measure
def jfs():
    return random.choice(list(open(WORDS_FILENAME)))


def timef(func, number=1000, timer=default_timer):
    """Return number of seconds it takes to execute `func()`."""
    start = timer()
    for _ in range(number):
        func()
    return (timer() - start) / number


def main():
    # measure time
    times = dict((f.__name__, timef(f, number=10))
                 for f in measure.func_to_measure)

    # print from fastest to slowest
    maxname_len = max(map(len, times))
    last = None
    for name in sorted(times, key=times.__getitem__):
        print "%s %4.2g seconds %.2f" % (name.ljust(maxname_len), times[name],
                                         last and times[name] / last or 1)
        last = times[name]


if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
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2  
"It is efficient human-time-wise" is a great point. –  Will McCutchen Sep 21 '09 at 23:42
1  
Above and beyond the call of duty, I'd say. Well done. –  Mark Ransom Sep 23 '09 at 23:02
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Pythonizing my answer from What’s the best way to return a random line in a text file using C? :

import random

def select_random_line(filename):
    selection = None
    count = 0
    for line in file(filename, "r"):
        if random.randint(0, count) == 0:
            selection = line.strip()
        count = count + 1
    return selection

print select_random_line("/etc/dictionaries-common/words")

Edit: the original version of my answer used readlines, which didn't work as I thought and was totally unnecessary. This version will iterate through the file instead of reading it all into memory, and do it in a single pass, which should make it much more efficient than any answer I've seen thus far.

Generalized version

import random

def choose_from(iterable):
    """Choose a random element from a finite `iterable`.

    If `iterable` is a sequence then use `random.choice()` for efficiency.

    Return tuple (random element, total number of elements)
    """
    selection, i = None, None
    for i, item in enumerate(iterable):
        if random.randint(0, i) == 0:
            selection = item

    return selection, (i+1 if i is not None else 0)

Examples

print choose_from(open("/etc/dictionaries-common/words"))
print choose_from(dict(a=1, b=2))
print choose_from(i for i in range(10) if i % 3 == 0)
print choose_from(i for i in range(10) if i % 11 == 0 and i) # empty
print choose_from([0]) # one element
chunk, n = choose_from(urllib2.urlopen("http://google.com"))
print (chunk[:20], n)

Output

('yeps\n', 98569)
('a', 2)
(6, 4)
(None, 0)
(0, 1)
('window._gjp && _gjp(', 10)
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Maintaining an index by incrementing is rather unpythonic. May I suggest: for count, line in enumerate(file(filename, "r")): –  recursive Sep 21 '09 at 21:56
    
I've never used enumerate, but it looks like a good suggestion. Thanks. An unexpected benefit of posting to StackOverflow is learning new stuff. –  Mark Ransom Sep 21 '09 at 22:09
    
I've added generalized version that works for any finite iterable. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 22 '09 at 22:08
    
Mark, It is hard to tell which version (among all answers) is faster without measurements. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 22 '09 at 22:18
1  
My educated guess is that my educated guess about performance is wrong as a rule. I've added some measurements to my answer stackoverflow.com/questions/1456617/… –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 23 '09 at 22:56
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You could do this without using fileinput:

import random
data = open("/etc/dictionaries-common/words").readlines()
print random.choice(data)

I have also used data instead of file because file is a predefined type in Python.

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I don't have code for you but as far as an algorithm goes:

  1. Find the file's size
  2. Do a random seek with the seek() function
  3. Find the next (or previous) whitespace character
  4. Return the word that starts after that whitespace character
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How does one find the size of a file in Python? This would definitely be more efficient. –  kzh Sep 21 '09 at 22:40
1  
os.stat(path).st_size. However note that this method is not completely ‘fair’: words following long words are more likely to be chosen. –  bobince Sep 22 '09 at 0:25
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Efficiency and verbosity aren't the same thing in this case. It's tempting to go for the most beautiful, pythonic approach that does everything in one or two lines but for file I/O, stick with classic fopen-style, low-level interaction, even if it does take up a few more lines of code.

I could copy and paste some code and claim it to be my own (others can if they want) but have a look at this: http://mail.python.org/pipermail/tutor/2007-July/055635.html

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Choosing a random point in the file biases your selection to longer words -- eg "antidisestablishmentarianism" (or the word following it, depending on your implementation) will be 28 times more likely to appear than (the word following) "a". –  Anthony Towns Sep 21 '09 at 20:43
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There are a few different ways to optimize this problem. You can optimize for speed, or for space.

If you want a quick but memory-hungry solution, read in the entire file using file.readlines() and then use random.choice()

If you want a memory-efficient solution, first check the number of lines in the file by calling somefile.readline() repeatedly until it returns "", then generate a random number smaller then the number of lines (say, n), seek back to the beginning of the file, and finally call somefile.readline() n times. The next call to somefile.readline() will return the desired random line. This approach wastes no memory holding "unnecessary" lines. Of course, if you plan on getting lots of random lines from the file, this will be horribly inefficient, and it's better to just keep the entire file in memory, like in the first approach.

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You may also cache just the positions of the newlines in the file, which would allow you to jump to a particular line with a single seek command. –  Bugmaster Sep 21 '09 at 21:44
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