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I'm using OpenGL ES to display some objects exported from Blender. Blender provides a list of vertices, a list of the face indices and a list of the 2d texture co-ordinates. Within Blender, and I believe generally in OpenGL, the texture co-ordinates map to each vertex described in the index array.

I suppose I have two questions:

  1. I'm given to understand(see the "Applying Textures" section) that in OpenGL ES the texture co-ordinates map to the vertex buffer only, not the index buffer. Is this the case or is there a way of binding the texture co-ords to the index buffer instead?

  2. If the above is true, is there anything to be gained from using an index buffer at all? After all to properly map the textures one will need to write out the vertex buffer with all the redundancy that would have been saved with the index buffer. Is there still a performance increase to be gained or are index buffers redundant for textured data?

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re your tweet: split this question in two: ask your first question, seeking for information (avoid phrases like "is there any point in"), then the latter can be answered by making a small benchmark. –  David Schmitt Sep 22 '09 at 11:35
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I disagree. I shouldn't have to tailor my questions to appeal to reputation farmers (or is this site turning into digg). The questions address the same issue and would best be answered by the same answerer. –  Tom Martin Sep 22 '09 at 11:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

1) I'm given to understand that in OpenGL ES the texture co-ordinates map to the vertex buffer only, not the index buffer.

Right, texture coordinates are relative to vertex data (either buffered or in cpu space) NOT index data. The index mechanism is independant from texturing.

Suppose you have this vertex array, made of 3 vertices (3 components each):

float vdata[] = {x0,y0,z0, x1,y1,z1, x2,y2,z2};

and this texcoord array, made of 3 coordinates (2 components each):

float tdata[] = {u0,v0,    u1,v1,    u2,v2};

When declaring this data to OpenGL, you associate the vertex 0 (x0,y0,z0) with the texture coordinate 0 (u0,v0), the vertex 1 with the texture coordinate 1 and so forth. At the end it will map on your triangle made of 3 vertices/3 texture coordinates the portion of the texture corresponding.

Here's the traditional OpenGL picture but for a four-vertices polygon.

alt text

Index data (buffered or not) is a way of specifying the vertices with an indirection and not in a sequentially way. In my previous example, if i would like to render the triangle twice i would specify an index array like that:

unsigned int idata[] = {0,1,2, 0,1,2};

So for responding to 1), index data is independent from texcoords or other vertex attributes like colors, normals, etc, hence it makes no sense willing to bind texcoords to index data.

2) After all to properly map the textures one will need to write out the vertex buffer with all the redundancy that would have been saved with the index buffer. Is there still a performance increase to be gained or are index buffers redundant for textured data?

Usually, indexing your meshes is a way of eliminating redundancies when reusing same vertices and consequently have a less costly memory footprint. In most of the cases I believe there is a lot of redundancies.

Of course if you take a 3D cube, no vertices are sharing the same texcoords or normals, but that's not a representative model! I believe most of the meshes in Gaming/CAD applications are continuous surfaces with a lot of vertex redundancies and benefit a lot of indexing.

Secondly, when having indices, the GPU can use pre/post-vertex caches for speeding up rendering. About memory bandwidth, having indices is almost free because the graphics driver put them in pci-express memory (DMAs) and so doesn't eat up video memory bandwidth.

All in all, i don't think it's a bad thing for performances using index buffers even if you have few repetitions of vertices, but as usually you should check against different OpenGL implementations and make your own tests.

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Thanks for the in depth answer. So vertex info is only consider redundant when it also has the same texture and normal values? And this isn't just limited to OpenGL ES as I first though. –  Tom Martin Sep 28 '09 at 11:49
    
Well, what I mean by redundant, is when a vertex (with exactly same attributes: color, texcoord, normal, etc) is repeating several times in the description of your mesh. Keep in mind too that when specifying the vertex array and all other attribute arrays (colors, normals etc) they all must have the same element count (and it's valid for OpenGL and DirectX too). –  Stringer Sep 28 '09 at 20:30

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