Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#import "ApiService.h"

@implementation ApiService
static ApiService *sharedInstance = nil;

+ (ApiService *)sharedInstance
{
    if (sharedInstance == nil)
    {
        sharedInstance =  [[self alloc]init];
    }

    return sharedInstance;
}

- (id)init
{
    if (self = [super init])
    {
    }
    return self;
}
@end

When I call +sharedInstance what does self refer to? How am I allowed to call init from a Class method?

share|improve this question
    
Check out this question for a better way to make a singleton: stackoverflow.com/questions/5720029/… –  Eric Jan 28 '13 at 16:36
    
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

self is the class.

+ (id)create {
  return [[self alloc] init];
}

Is the same as:

+ (id)create {
  return [[SomeClass alloc] init];
}

Or in your example:

+ (ApiService *)sharedInstance
{
    if (sharedInstance == nil)
    {
        sharedInstance =  [[ApiService alloc]init];
    }

    return sharedInstance;
}

This allows you to call class methods on self from class methods. And it allows you to call them on the child class when you have inheritance, as class methods are inherited too.

share|improve this answer
    
If self is the class, then when you do things like: self.property, how can that be the class? unless the property is static? –  Rob Jan 28 '13 at 16:52
    
@Rob, indeed there are 2 selfs in objective-c, check developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/General/… –  vikingosegundo Jan 28 '13 at 16:56
    
or better phrased: classes are objects themselves and as such they can send messages to themselves via self. stackoverflow.com/questions/5773054/… –  vikingosegundo Jan 28 '13 at 17:11
1  
Rob — why not? it is totally right. –  vikingosegundo Jan 28 '13 at 17:13
1  
It has practical reasons to use self in class methods. In a inheritance scenario, using "self" instead of "ApiService" will guarantee that subclass of ApiService don't have to override "sharedInstance" method and be able to get the subclass object correctly. This trick is actually mentioned in Apple's programming guide developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/cocoa/conceptual/…. At very bottom, Tip: Rather than using [[XYZPerson alloc] init] in the class factory method, instead try using [[self alloc] init]. –  dalef Nov 13 '13 at 20:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.