Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a RESTful API with Django and django-rest-framework: http://django-rest-framework.org/

As authentication mechanism we've chosen "Token Authentication" and I have already implemented it following Django-Rest-Framework's documentation, the question is, should the application renew / change the Token periodically and if yes how? Should it be the mobile app that requires the token to be renewed or the web-app should do it autonomously?

What is the best practice?

Has anybody here experience with Django Rest Framework and could suggest a technical solution?

(the last question has lower priority)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

It is good practice to have mobile clients periodically renew their authentication token. This of course is up to the server to enforce.

The default TokenAuthentication class does not support this, however you can extend it to achieve this functionality.

For example:

class ExpiringTokenAuthentication(TokenAuthentication):
    def authenticate_credentials(self, key):
        try:
            token = self.model.objects.get(key=key)
        except self.model.DoesNotExist:
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('Invalid token')

        if not token.user.is_active:
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('User inactive or deleted')

        # This is required for the time comparison
        utc_now = datetime.utcnow()
        utc_now = utc_now.replace(tzinfo=pytz.utc)

        if token.created < utc_now - timedelta(hours=24):
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('Token has expired')

        return token.user, token

It is also required to override the default rest framework login view, so that the token is refreshed whenever a login is done:

class ObtainExpiringAuthToken(ObtainAuthToken):
    def post(self, request):
        serializer = self.serializer_class(data=request.DATA)
        if serializer.is_valid():
            token, created =  Token.objects.get_or_create(user=serializer.object['user'])

            if not created:
                # update the created time of the token to keep it valid
                token.created = datetime.datetime.utcnow()
                token.save()

            return Response({'token': token.key})
        return Response(serializer.errors, status=status.HTTP_400_BAD_REQUEST)

obtain_expiring_auth_token = ObtainExpiringAuthToken.as_view()

And don't forget to modify the urls:

urlpatterns += patterns(
    '',
    url(r'^users/login/?$', '<path_to_file>.obtain_expiring_auth_token'),
)
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for this answer.. soon i'll try it out and let you know how it goes.. –  nemesisdesign May 12 '13 at 10:00
1  
Wouldn't you want to create a new token in ObtainExpiringAuthToken if it's expired though, rather than just update the timestamp for the old one? –  Joar Leth Sep 30 '13 at 12:50
1  
Creating a new token makes sense. You could also regenerate the value of the existing tokens key and then you would not have to delete the old token. –  odedfos Nov 7 '13 at 14:06

I've tried @odedfos answer but I had misleading error. Here is the same answer, fixed and with proper imports.

views.py

import datetime
from django.utils.timezone import utc
from rest_framework.authtoken.views import ObtainAuthToken

class ObtainExpiringAuthToken(ObtainAuthToken):
    def post(self, request):
        serializer = self.serializer_class(data=request.DATA)
        if serializer.is_valid():
            token, created =  Token.objects.get_or_create(user=serializer.object['user'])

            if not created:
                # update the created time of the token to keep it valid
                token.created = datetime.datetime.utcnow().replace(tzinfo=utc)
                token.save()

            return Response({'token': token.key})
        return Response(serializer.errors, status=status.HTTP_400_BAD_REQUEST)

authentication.py

import datetime
from django.utils.timezone import utc
from rest_framework.authentication import TokenAuthentication
from rest_framework import exceptions

class ExpiringTokenAuthentication(TokenAuthentication):
    def authenticate_credentials(self, key):
        try:
            token = self.model.objects.get(key=key)
        except self.model.DoesNotExist:
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('Invalid token')

        if not token.user.is_active:
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('User inactive or deleted')

        utc_now = datetime.datetime.utcnow().replace(tzinfo=utc)

        if token.created < utc_now - datetime.timedelta(hours=24):
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('Token has expired')

        return (token.user, token)
share|improve this answer

If someone is interested by that solution but wants to have a token that is valid for a certain time then gets replaced by a new token here's the complete solution (Django 1.6):

yourmodule/views.py:

import datetime
from django.utils.timezone import utc
from rest_framework.authtoken.views import ObtainAuthToken
from rest_framework.authtoken.models import Token
from django.http import HttpResponse
import json

class ObtainExpiringAuthToken(ObtainAuthToken):
    def post(self, request):
        serializer = self.serializer_class(data=request.DATA)
        if serializer.is_valid():
            token, created =  Token.objects.get_or_create(user=serializer.object['user'])

        utc_now = datetime.datetime.utcnow()    
        if not created and token.created < utc_now - datetime.timedelta(hours=24):
            token.delete()
            token = Token.objects.create(user=serializer.object['user'])
            token.created = datetime.datetime.utcnow()
            token.save()

        #return Response({'token': token.key})
        response_data = {'token': token.key}
        return HttpResponse(json.dumps(response_data), content_type="application/json")

    return HttpResponse(serializer.errors, status=status.HTTP_400_BAD_REQUEST)

obtain_expiring_auth_token = ObtainExpiringAuthToken.as_view()

yourmodule/urls.py:

from django.conf.urls import patterns, include, url
from weights import views

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^token/', 'yourmodule.views.obtain_expiring_auth_token')
)

your project urls.py (in the urlpatterns array):

url(r'^', include('yourmodule.urls')),

yourmodule/authentication.py:

import datetime
from django.utils.timezone import utc
from rest_framework.authentication import TokenAuthentication
from rest_framework import exceptions

class ExpiringTokenAuthentication(TokenAuthentication):
    def authenticate_credentials(self, key):

        try:
            token = self.model.objects.get(key=key)
        except self.model.DoesNotExist:
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('Invalid token')

        if not token.user.is_active:
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('User inactive or deleted')

        utc_now = datetime.datetime.utcnow()

        if token.created < utc_now - datetime.timedelta(hours=24):
            raise exceptions.AuthenticationFailed('Token has expired')

        return (token.user, token)

In your REST_FRAMEWORK settings add ExpiringTokenAuthentication as an Authentification class instead of TokenAuthentication:

REST_FRAMEWORK = {

    'DEFAULT_AUTHENTICATION_CLASSES': (
        'rest_framework.authentication.SessionAuthentication',
        #'rest_framework.authentication.TokenAuthentication',
        'yourmodule.authentication.ExpiringTokenAuthentication',
    ),
}
share|improve this answer

If you notice that a token is like a session cookie then you could stick to the default lifetime of session cookies in Django: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.4/ref/settings/#session-cookie-age.

I don't know if Django Rest Framework handles that automatically but you can always write a short script which filters out the outdated ones and marks them as expired.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.