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I have a time series of files 0000.vx.dat, 0000.vy.dat, 0000.vz.dat; ...; 0077.vx.dat, 0077.vy.dat, 0077.vz.dat... Each file is a space-separated 2D matrix. I would like to take each triplet of files and combine them all into a coordinate-based data format, i.e.:

[timestep + 1] [i] [j] [vx(i,j)] [vy(i,j)] [vz(i,j)]

Each file number corresponds to a particular time step. Given the amount of data I have in this time series (~ 4 GB), bash wasn't cutting it so it seemed to be time to head over to awk... specifically mawk. It was pretty stupid to try this in bash but here is my ill-fated attempt:

for x in $(seq 1 78)
do
  tfx=${tf[$x]} # an array of padded zeros
  for y in $(seq 1 1568)
  do
    for z in $(seq 1 1344)
    do
      echo $x $y $z $(awk -v i=$z -v j=$y "FNR == i {print j}" $tfx.vx.dat) $(awk -v i=$z -v j=$y "FNR == i {print j}" $tfx.vy.dat) $(awk -v i=$z -v j=$y "FNR == i {print j}" $tfx.vz.dat) >> $file
    done
  done
done

edit: Thank you, ruakh, for pointing out that I had kept j in shell variable format with a $ in front! This is just a snippet of the original script, but I guess would be considered the guts of it!

Suffice it to say this would have taken about six months because of all the memory overhead in bash associated with O(MxN) algorithms, subshells and pipes and whatnot. I was looking for more along the lines of a day at most. Each file is around 18 MB, so it should not be that much of a problem. I would be happy with doing this one timestep at a time in awk provided that I get one output file per timestep. I could just cat them all together without much issue afterwords, I think. It is important, though, that the time step number be the first item on the coordinate list. I could achieve this with an awk -v argument (see above) in with a bash routine. I do not know how to look up specific elements of matrices in three separate files and put them all together into one output. This is the main hurdle I would like to overcome. I was hoping mawk could provide a nice balance between effort and computational speed. If this seems to be too much for an awk script, I could go to something lower level, and would appreciate any of those answering letting me know I should just go to C instead.

Thank you in advance! I really like awk, but am afraid I am a novice.

The three files, 0000.vx.dat, 0000.vy.dat, and 0000.vz.dat would read as follows (except huge and of the correct dimensions):

0000.vx.dat:

1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9

0000.vy.dat:

10 11 12
13 14 15
16 17 18

0000.vz.dat:

19 20 21
22 23 24
25 26 27

I would like to be able to input:

awk -v t=1 -f stackoverflow.awk 0000.vx.dat 0000.vy.dat 0000.vz.dat

and get the following output:

1 1 1 1 10 19
1 1 2 2 11 20
1 1 3 3 12 21
1 2 1 4 13 22
1 2 2 5 14 23
1 2 3 6 15 24
1 3 1 7 16 25
1 3 2 8 17 26
1 3 3 9 18 27

edit: Thank you, shellter, for suggesting I put the desired input and output more clearly!

share|improve this question
    
Performance aside, your Bash script doesn't do what you want. Firstly -- $j is not a Bash variable, so "FNR == i {print $j}" expands to "FNR == i {print }", which prints the entire i-th line. Secondly, you've chosen confusing variable-names (x for timestep rather than x-axis, y and z for i and j rather than y- and z-axis), which is not a bug in and of itself, but I think it's led you to accidentally transpose your matrices. Or are your matrices actually stored in column-major order? –  ruakh Jan 28 '13 at 18:45
    
(I realize that you want to just jettison the Bash script completely, but I mention these problems because it's hard to write the better-performing replacement when it's not clear quite what it's supposed to do. A clear, bug-free Bash script would be very helpful.) –  ruakh Jan 28 '13 at 18:51
    
now that I see your output, I still don't understand why you have # an array of padded zeros ? Also what are you using the value assigned in your sample invocation, -v t=1. I don't see an explict ${t} in your bash code. A very interesting problem, but sorry I don't be able to look at this for a while. Good luck. –  shellter Jan 28 '13 at 22:56
    
@shellter: The array of padded zeroes is to generate the filenames: that array maps (e.g.) 7 to 0006, because timestep #7 is in 0006.v{x,y,z}.dat. And I assume the -v t=1 means "timestep #1", to be used by stackoverflow.awk in generating the first column of its output. –  ruakh Jan 29 '13 at 1:34
    
print j is not what you want, either: that will print the value of j, but you want to print the value in position j. (For example, if j is 3, you want to print the third field, but print j will just print the number 3.) You were right to use the $, but you need to wrap your AWK script in single-quotes so that Bash doesn't expand the $j before AWK has a chance to see it. –  ruakh Jan 29 '13 at 1:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Personally, I use gawk to process most of my text files. However, since you have requested a mawk compatible solution, here's one way to solve your problem. Run, in your present working directory:

for i in *.vx.dat; do nawk -f script.awk "$i" "${i%%.*}.vy.dat" "${i%%.*}.vz.dat"; done

Contents of script.awk:

FNR==1 {
    FILENAME++
    c=0
}

{
    for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {
        c++
        a[c] = (a[c] ? a[c] : FILENAME FS NR FS i) FS $i
    }
}

END {
    for (j=1;j<=c;j++) {
        print a[j] > sprintf("%04d.dat", FILENAME)
    }
}

When you run the above, the results should be a single file for each set of three files containing your coordinates. These output files will have the filenames in the form: timestamp + 1 ".dat". I decided to pad these filenames with four 0's for your convenience. But you can change this to whatever format you like. Here's the results I get from the sample data you've posted. Contents of 0001.dat:

1 1 1 1 10 19
1 1 2 2 11 20
1 1 3 3 12 21
1 2 1 4 13 22
1 2 2 5 14 23
1 2 3 6 15 24
1 3 1 7 16 25
1 3 2 8 17 26
1 3 3 9 18 27
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, steve! This solved it exactly. The file name it was saving to wasn't iterating for some reason, though, so I just piped the output from mawk into that iteration's filename in bash. This has been a real lifesaver. I am going to learn awk more earnestly than ever now. Uses like this are really impressive and helpful in computational science. My goal would be to build a library of file type conversions. One day... –  thomasjames Jan 29 '13 at 9:42
    
One last question, is there anyway to pass a variable to be the first entry? That is to say so that the next file would have: 2 1 1 1 10 19 and so forth. I know I can add a -v t=$variable to the awk command, but i am curious how I would access that variable t within the awk script. –  thomasjames Jan 29 '13 at 10:04
    
Figured it out on my own: a[c] = (a[c] ? a[c] : FILENAME FS NR FS i) FS $i becomes a[c] = (a[c] ? a[c] : t FS NR FS i) FS $i. Thanks again, steve! –  thomasjames Jan 29 '13 at 10:11
    
@ThomasJames: Glad you got it sorted. Cheers! –  Steve Jan 29 '13 at 16:08

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