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I have this piece of code that loads Properties from a file:

class Config {
  val properties: Properties = {
    val p = new Properties()
    p.load(Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader.getResourceAsStream("props"))
    p
  }

  val forumId = properties.get("forum_id")
}

This seems to be working fine.

I have tried moving the initialization of properties into another val, loadedProperties, like this:

class Config {
  val properties: Properties = loadedProps
  val forumId = properties.get("forum_id")

  private val loadedProps = {
    val p = new Properties()
    p.load(Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader.getResourceAsStream("props"))
    p 
   }

}

But it doesn't work! (properties is null in properties.get("forum_id") ).

Why would that be? Isn't loadedProps evaluated when referenced by properties?

Secondly, is this a good way to initialize variables that require non-trivial processing? In Java, I would declare them final fields, and do the initialization-related operations in the constructor.

Is there a pattern for this scenario in Scala?

Thank you!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Vals are initialized in the order they are declared (well, precisely, non-lazy vals are), so properties is getting initialized before loadedProps. Or in other words, loadedProps is still null when propertiesis getting initialized. The simplest solution here is to define loadedProps before properties:

class Config {
  private val loadedProps = {
    val p = new Properties()
    p.load(Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader.getResourceAsStream("props"))
    p 
  }
  val properties: Properties = loadedProps
  val forumId = properties.get("forum_id")
}

You could also make loadedProps lazy, meaning that it will be initialized on its first access:

class Config {
  val properties: Properties = loadedProps
  val forumId = properties.get("forum_id")

  private lazy val loadedProps = {
    val p = new Properties()
    p.load(Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader.getResourceAsStream("props"))
    p 
  }
}

Using lazy val has the advantage that your code is more robust to refactoring, as merely changing the declaration order of your vals won't break your code.

Also in this particular occurence, you can just turn loadedProps into a def (as suggested by @NIA) as it is only used once anyway.

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Using lazy to hedge initialization order issues can be convenient, but there are costs: 1) The accessor method is no longer a simple field retrieval (will they be inlined by HotSpot or other on-demand native code compilers?); 2) The accessor includes synchronization code; 3) Every instance requires a field holding the bits that encode the intialized status of each lazy val. –  Randall Schulz Jan 29 '13 at 2:03
1  
All true, but if we have to talk about these issues, the cost for point (2) is that of a volatile access (actual synchronization only occurs on the very first access, when actually initializing) which can be significantly cheaper. Concerning point (1), you have to realize that even with a plain val you will go through a call to the getter rather than directly accessing the underlying filed (unless your val is private[this]). Granted, the method just does a field access and might inline better at runtime. More to the point, these (very real) costs are not even remotly an issue in most cases. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Jan 29 '13 at 11:57
    
Obviously, the direct corollary is that these costs can be an issue in some situations, so there is no doubt that it is good to know them. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Jan 29 '13 at 11:59

I think here loadedProps can be simply turned into a function by simply replacing val with def:

private def loadedProps = {
  // Tons of code
}

In this case you are sure that it is called when you call it.

But not sure is it a pattern for this case.

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Alternatively, you can make loadedProps lazy with lazy keyword and move them on top of your class declaration. –  om-nom-nom Jan 28 '13 at 18:01
    
Indeed, it behaves correctly with def instead of val, but I don't understand why. I expected loadedProps to be evaluated when referenced. I suppose it may have something to do with it being on the right-hand-side, but what's the rule then? How to avoid accidents? –  teo Jan 28 '13 at 18:07
    
@NIA's answer is correct. The reasoning is that vals are initialized from top to bottom and clearly loadedProps' initializer hasn't been evaluated at the time forumId's initializer is evaluated. –  Randall Schulz Jan 28 '13 at 18:13
1  
@teo please, see this entry –  om-nom-nom Jan 28 '13 at 18:20

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